Talking Stock #10 Whether to weather with Muz

Weathering has been the subject of many books and articles in the past, it is seen by some as a black art, enjoyed by others, and many myths also perpetuated (such as you can only do it an airbrush!) There are various different methods and materials that can be used and many are as just as effective as others. I first put online via RMweb many moons ago my own methods, which then formed the basis of an article in the October 2008 issue of Hornby Magazine and now a version can found online in the Model Railway Features section of British Railway Modelling Magazine’s website Model Railways Live

An example of weathered locomotives awaiting cleaning at Fisherton Sarum

The staged method that I devised over time, practice and observation is broken down into stages which I hope makes it simple for others to have a go and try. I stress that it is only my approach and there are many others. None of them, either the methods or the materials used, are either the only way or right or wrong.

It’s not just locomotives but also rolling stock that should be weathered to maintain consistency as can be seen in the coal wagons here on Fisherton Saram

However first and foremost the most important stage whatever the method being used is to research and seek photographs of the effect that you are looking for from the real thing, rather than using your imagination or copying someone else’s interpretation on a model as the finished effect will be so much better. At the end of the day have a go, practice on something simple, costs effective such a box wagon to start with and go from there. At the end of the day it’s both fun and rewarding.

My staged approached can be found on the BRM Model Railways Live website here.

6 thoughts on “Talking Stock #10 Whether to weather with Muz

  1. ‘However first and foremost the most important stage whatever the method being used is to research and seek photographs of the effect that you are looking for from the real thing, rather than using your imagination or copying someone ‘ – spot on Graham. I’ve seen so many weathering efforts that clearly have paid no reference whatsoever to the appearance of the real thing and they look truly awful.

    I think I commented a while ago that your staged approach is very similar to mine, I always use both paint brushes and the airbrush to achieve weathering effects and I like to think I do a good job (most of the time – I’ve had my moments!).

    I would add that weathering is very subjective and what looks fine to one modeller will look wrong to another.

    Glenn

  2. I am experimenting with the new micro particle weathering powders and Testors Dullcote spray to fix the effect afterward. The effect can be very good particularly on the undercarriages of rolling stock.

    i am still trying to get the right tired look on a West Country as it arrives in Padstow after the long journey from Waterloo (Didn’t they change locomotives somewhere on the ACE?)

    best

    Ken
    (Walnut Creek, California)

    1. The ACE would have changed engines at Salisbury and Exeter although in later BR days Merchant Navy’s worked right through from Waterloo to Exeter with just a crew change at Salisbury. Post war it wold have been worked with Merchant Navy’s from Waterloo to Exeter and Light Pacific’s from Exeter.

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