Workbench Witterings #8 Taking a ‘brake’ from wagons rolling of the workbench

As I advised in my recent Covid, exhibitions, mental health and life changes post, in an attempt to restore my modelling mojo whilst on furlough I started to build a number of the wagon kits that I had added to the to do later pile over the last few years.

The Diagram 1410 Covered Goods Wagons awaiting painting
The crispness of the Cambrian Models mouldings can be clearly seen in with this Diagram 1316 open
The finished painted and lettered wagons in pre and post 1936 liveries.
The Diagram 1426 shows of its height against a low roofed Diagram 1410

The kits were all from the excellent Cambrian Models range and comprised of:

  • 4 off ex LSWR 10t Covered Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1410
  • 2 off ex SECR 10t Covered Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1426
  • 1 off ex LSWR 8 plank 12t Open Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1316

These kits are of an excellent standard, with crisp mouldings and assemble quite easily once you have got your head around some of the various options, mainly around the type and number of brakes fitted. As usual I refer to the bibles for Southern wagon builders the “Illustrated History of Southern Wagons” the four volumes are now sadly out of print but are worth tracking down if you don’t already have access to copies.

Although I follow the well written and detailed instructions; I tend to replace the plastic buffer heads with metal replacements from the Alan Gibson range or similar to give additional durability. I also add some cut lead sheet to the underside of the chassis to bring the weight up to approximately 30 grams (around one ounce for older readers) as this improves running. I always fit brass top hat pin point bearings into the axle boxes and use Alan Gibson wheels.
I tend to purchase these kits, wheels etc. either at shows, when we could, or online from H&A Models whom always provide a friendly and efficient service and in these times it’s always good to help and continue to support such excellent traders.

The Hornby Diagram 1543 ‘New’ van showing the incorrect brown and oversize Tare lettering height
The paint dries in the oven
B4 No. 82 runs around the two repainted Hornby Diagram 1543 brake vans.
A very busy scene at Canute Road Quay as all the wagon builds have come to visit

In addition to the above wagons, whilst on a roll, I have finally got round to repainting the two Hornby ex LSWR 20t Warner ‘New’ diagram 1543 brake vans that arrived at the start of year. Whist excellent models the SR versions in this first batch were not finished in the correct shade of SR Brown, also the Tare lettering was incorrectly the same size as the wagon number when it should be smaller. A nice touch by Hornby  is that they provide a separate beautifully printed plate for the “Not to work between Tonbridge and West St. Leonards via Battle” in addition to it being pre printed on the wagon side, so I have affixed these to the repaints.

For all my wagons I tend to follow the same painting process:

  • Firstly for the kit builds I give a dusting of Halford plastic primer from an aerosol ‘rattle’ can
  • I then brush paint the base colour, I prefer to paint two thin coats rather than one heavy coat.
  • I always help dry the paintwork in a warmed oven (set to less than 50 deg and the door kept open, luckily, I don’t need to ask anyone permission first!).
  • In most cases I use lettering from the HMRS Pressfix transfer range and I use a mix of pre (large SR) and post 1936 (small SR) styles to give some variety.
  • Finally, I apply Railmatch Satin Varnish from a rattle can to fix the lettering and even the finish.

Well I said finally, but actually the wagons now await degrees of weathering that I tend to do as a batch and still have to do so for those shown here.

 

10 thoughts on “Workbench Witterings #8 Taking a ‘brake’ from wagons rolling of the workbench”

  1. We are very lucky in the 2FS society to be in a similar position to you whereas we can purchase the wheels and bearings for our wagons and coaching stock. Thanks for posting those pictures of your handiwork

    Pete

  2. You brush painted the wagons. Do they look so good because you have been doing it for so long? Do you actually have a spray gun for other jobs?

    1. grahammuz – A railway modeller with a keen insterest in all things Southern Railway especially the 1946 to 1949 period. I can often be seen on the exhibition circuit with my Layout Fisherton Sarum or assiting MIke Wild the Editor of Hornby Magazine with his layouts at shows. I am also long time member of the High Wycombe and District Model Railway Society
      grahammuz says:

      You Hi Simon, I have always used a mix of brush painting, rattle can and /or airbrush depending on the model and the colour required. For wooden bodied wagons brush painting (with the plank grain) is quick and easy, the use of the rattle can varnish over the top flattens any brush marks to even the finish (it’s a trick employed by some classic commercial vehicle restorers, brush paint base colour and spray varnish)

  3. You’ve got more modelling mojo than I have in this heat. nice set of wagons though. I saw on the weekly email from Hattons that Hornby are releasing a second batch of brake vans. Do you have any inkling if these will be in the ‘correct’ brown hue? Save a lot of trouble if they are.

    1. grahammuz – A railway modeller with a keen insterest in all things Southern Railway especially the 1946 to 1949 period. I can often be seen on the exhibition circuit with my Layout Fisherton Sarum or assiting MIke Wild the Editor of Hornby Magazine with his layouts at shows. I am also long time member of the High Wycombe and District Model Railway Society
      grahammuz says:

      Hi Richard
      Luckily living in a 600yo brick and flint cottage means it stays cooler inside than most places.
      The new version of the were announced as part of the 2020 range and if the sample pictures here https://www.hornby.com/uk-en/news/the-engine-shed/east-coast-line-bumper-edition are anything to go by they have amended the colour although I am still not sure it is dark enough, but certainly an improvement.

      1. Thanks Graham – maybe need to put it down to scale colour and fading. 🙂

  4. My ex-LSWR Hornby Brake I decided to take a short cut to a complete repaint, and having masked the ends, underframe and roof, with tiny bits of masking tape covered the large SR and number/tare lettering, then wafted a black rattle can near it, which darkenned it down quite acceptably, and also weathered the hand rails. The roof is also no longer white!

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