7mm scale Bulleid coaches under development by Greenwood & Pring

Greenwood & Pring have announced the development of a new 0 Gauge premium finescale carriage programme based on Southern Railway’s Bulleid coaches. These carriages will be manufactured in brass in Korea to a high specification with both skirted and non-skirted coach types. All metal construction Bulleid three coach sets no: 770-793 comprise the non-skirted version and the Bournemouth six coach sets no: 290-300 are the skirted type.

The models will be meticulously researched using original drawings, image material and examples of preserved and modified stock. They will hand-made from brass with fine scale soldered construction ensuring superb body detail.

Other features include:

  • Interior LED carriage lighting
  • Finished in long-lasting and robust oven baked satin paint
  • Coach nameboards commemorating famous expresses
  • Ball bearing mounted axel boxes for free running bogies
  • Solid stainless steel disc wheels with back-to-back set at 29mm
  • Conversion pack for standard/coarse scale Hi Rail wheels set at 27.5mm
  • Three coupling types: Standard Kadee style couplings. Conversion packs for screw link drop or alternative buckeye couplings (a standard on Bulleid coaches) are available. Note the screw link drop coupling is suitable to align with ACE style drop link couplings
  • Removeable carriage body so the interior can be accessed for the fitting of figures.

Bulleid three coach sets no: 770-793

Bulleid sets no: 770-793 providing accommodation for 24 first-class and 120 third-class passengers were built between December 1946 and November 1947. The three coach set options available will be:

  • Sets no: 771, no: 774, no: 775, no: 777, no: 782, no: 787 and no: 789
  • Two livery styles in Southern Railway malachite green and British Railways Southern Region green.

Bournemouth six coach sets no: 290-300

Along with the non-skirted Bulleid three coach sets, the Bournemouth six coach sets will be produced in two separate phases:

Phase One comprising coached types BSK-CK-BSK with Phase Two being the coach types RFO-RT-TO to make up the following livery / Set combinations:

  • SR malachite with green ends; Set 300,
  • BR Malachite Green black ends Sets; 290, 292, 295 and 296
  • BR Blood and Custard Sets: 291, 293, 294, 298 and 299
  • BR(s) Green Sets: 291, 293, 294, 297, 298 and 299

Should there be sufficient customer interest set no: 299 may be produced in British Railways experimental livery – old style LNWR plum and off-white (plum and spilt milk).

A third phase may also be offered as a total of 22 open second saloons were transferred to BR Eastern and Scottish Regions in the 1960s for loose working and repainted in BR lined maroon livery. This release will comprise open second saloons only making them highly attractive for O Gauge modellers with East Coast and Scottish interests.

Prices are £625 per carriage or £600 each if ordered as a set.

Pre-production samples will be available for inspection at all Guild 0 Gauge events this year as well as other specialist meetings during 2023.

More details on the Greenwood & Pring website here…

Workbench Witterings#19 Building a Maunsell 350HP ‘trip’ locomotive

In my Talking Stock#15 post here I discuss the background to the three Maunsell 350HHp diesel ‘trip’ locomotives. In 1937 Maunsell ordered three six coupled 350hp diesel electric locos, built by the SR at Ashford with English Electric power units, to compare against the Z class 0-8-0 tanks.  They were numbered 1,2 an d 3. These along with later revised versions ordered by Bulleid, were the ancestors of the British Railways large class of 350hp shunters that became the 08/09 class.

Finished as SR No.2 the Maunsell 350hp makes an appearance on Canute Road Quay

Many years ago I built an example of the SR 350hp shunter utilising a Golden Arrow Productions resin body mounted on a Lima chassis. The Lima chassis was the best chassis option at the time. Golden Arrow Productions have since revised the resin body to fit the far superior Bachmann Class 08 chassis, so I thought I would build another before stripping down and updating my original version.
Although 3D Printing is becoming more and more popular,  I believe there is still a place for such resin kits, that are simple to handle and clean up and give a smoother finish straight from the mould.

The modified Bachmann 08 chassis

The kit nicely captures the SR shunters including their distinctive feature of the Ashford body, when compared with the later Class 08/09,  the overhang at the rear of the cab with two angled lower windows, as well as the more normal two vertical windows, giving clear visibility of the buffers and coupling area.

Following the kit instructions, the Bachmann 08 chassis requires a little modification to take account for drop in the running plate at the cab end. I also increased the width of the running plate edge with the addition of some plastic section.

The body with its handrails and bonnet catches etc. added

The resin parts were carefully (the resin material is much softer than other plastic / £SD print materials) cleaned up to remove any flash and the windows opened up. The main body parts comprising of the body, bonnet top, radiator and radiator cowl were assembled simply using superglue.  I then pre drilled the locations for the four cab door and multiple bonnet door hand rails and handles, these were then added using 0.45mm NS wire and for the bonnet door catches I used some etched brass T handles from a coach detailing fret in the spares box.
Lamp irons at each end were added using as usual Bambi staples cut and bent to shape.

A 3/4 front end view the front air tank can be seen either aside of the coupling mount

Although a bonnet ladder is included within the kit, I felt this was a like coarse so I used a finer signal ladder etching.

The kit includes white metal front bottom steps which I added to the chassis and folded up some spare brass etch fret to make the middle and top steps. The two handrails for each of the front steps were again made from the NS wire.

The Bachmann 08 has two small air tanks mounted at the front of the chassis either side of the NEM coupling pocket, the SR shunters had in reality a single air tank mounted across the front. Rather than keep the 08 arrangement, to better represent the SR shunter arrangement, I cut a suitably sized white metal coach vacuum tank, again from the spares box, to fit around the coupling pocket.

The 3.4 rear view showing the characteristic rear overhang with lower windows

If you are not using the coupling pocket then the tank can be fitted as one piece across the front.

The chassis was brush painted, whilst the body was given a dusting of the reliable rattle can Halford Plastic Primer before a top coat of their matt black. The usual HMRS transfers finish the model, she just awaits some weathering (and replacing one of the bonnet door catches that I now notice is missing). After painting I added the window glazing by cutting 20 thou clear plasticard to shape and glued in place using Deluxe Materials Glue and Glaze.

Overall this is a quick and simple project using the Golden Arrow Productions resin kit to build one of these distinctive SR three shunters, and will although a bit far from Norwood their usual stomping ground make an occasional appearance on Canute Road Quay.

 

Hornby announce their 2023 range, a summary of SR/BR(s) items

Hornby have today announced their forthcoming range for 2023 as being a year of catch up, so not a huge amount to report for SR / BR(s) modellers (or anyone really…unless you are a collector of Gresley pacifics).

New Tooling

Hornby’s new tooling for 2023 is not SR / BR(s) orientated and includes the LNER streamlined 4-6-0 B17/5 locomotive, no new coach tooling and the following wagons: GWR Macaw B / BR Bogie Bolster C, BR TTA tank wagon and LMS/ BR Salmon/YMO bogie wagon.  The LNER A1/A3 and prototype DELTIC are added to the Hornby Dublo diecast range.

Locomotives

The 100th anniversary of Grouping occurring at the start of this January is marked by the limited edition, (500 each model) “Big Four Centenary Collection” of one loco representing each of the big four, but being due in October…

With no new tooling of any kind for Southern modelers we see only the following two steam locomotive livery releases:

  • R30273 SR N15 ‘King Arthur Class’ 4-6-0 741 ‘Joyous Gard’ – Limited Edition – Big Four Centenary Collection – in Maunsell olive green livery as she was between June 1925 when named and January 1928 when fitted with smoke deflectors  – Era 3 – Due Oct 2023

  • R3860 BR Merchant Navy Class 4-6-2 35012 ‘United States Lines’ – in malachite green with wedge shaped cab, Gills Sans BR numerals as carried between March 1949 and January 1951 – Era 4 – Due Oct 2023

  • R30176TXS Railroad Plus GB Railfreight Class 73 Bo-Bo 73109 ‘Battle of Britain’ – Sound fitted – Era 10 – Due Nov 2023

And for Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway modellers as it was jointly run by the SR and LSWR before it and I am not just trying to fill the page honest:

  • R30285 S&DJR Blue Class 4F 0-6-0 No. 61 – Era 2 – Due Dec 2023
  • R30286 S&DJR Blue Class 2P 4-4-0 No. 46 – Era 2 – Due Dec 2023
  • R30316 RailRoad S&DJR Blue, Class 3F ‘Jinty’, 0-6-0, No. 20 Blue – Era 2 – Due August 2023
  • R30325 RailRoad S&DJR Black, Class 3F ‘Jinty’, 0-6-0, No. 25 – Era 2 – Due August 2023

Yep… that’s all folks… really no other SR/BR(s) model locos, coaches or wagons in the 2023 range!

In reality with quite a number of last years range and some still from 2021 to be delivered, along with the TT:120 investment that has taken place, it is perhaps not surprising that a more manageable scaled back, catch up, 2023 range has been announced.

Watch the full Hornby announcement video here.

However… there is a potential new ‘Generic’ Railroad 0-4-0t locomotive that might just have a passing resemblance to an Adams B4 (but stick with the Dapol version!) It should also be noted that the catalogue when it arrives may include some models that have not been included in today’s announcement and will not be available this year.

The ‘full’ Hornby 2023 range can be found on the Hornby website here of the RMweb forum here.  You can pre-order items from retailers such as Kernow Model Rail Centre here…

Marking 100 years since the formation of the Southern Railway – a potted history

It would be remiss of me not to mark the fact that today is 100 years since the Grouping and the formation of the Southern Railway, it also of course marks the demise of its constituent companies. This post attempts to provide a simplified potted history of the Grouping and the Southern Railway.

The Southern Railway coat of arms incorporated heraldic elements from the main constituent companies.

Although the actual Grouping occurred on 1st January 1923, it’s instigation can be traced back to the First World War where all railways were under state control until 1921. The Railways Act 1921, followed discussions at the time on potential nationalisation, had the aim of stemming the losses being occurred at the time by many of the 120 or so railway companies.

The form of Grouping originally proposed in 1920, by former North Eastern Railway executive, the Minister of Transport, Eric Geddes, was for five English and one Scottish regional companies, by 1921 this was amended to four English and two Scottish companies before the Scottish routes were incorporated in the companies that we know as the ‘Big Four’.  Royal Assent for the Railways Act was in August 1921.

The main Constituent companies of the Southern Railway were the well known three, actually four: The London and South Western Railway (LSWR), The London, Brighton and South Coast Railway (LBSCR) and the combined South Eastern Railway and the London, Chatham and Dover Railway, under the South Eastern & Chatham Railways’ Managing Committee (SECR).

The first SR passenger livery was a continuation of the LSWR style in Olive Green with expanded Clarendon ‘Egyptian’ style ‘Southern’ font as seen on ex LSWR Adams A12 0-4-2. From 1937 the Bulleid malachite green and ‘Sunshine’ lettering as seen on the ex LSWR M7 in the background was introduced.

Also incorporated were the three Isle of Wight railway companies and the Plymouth, Devonport and South Western Junction Railway (Bere Alston and Callington section).
Some non-working or joint companies that had been previously leased or worked by the main constituent companies, including for example (not an exhaustive list): the North Cornwall Railway, Sidmouth Railway, Lee-on-the-Solent Railway, Hayling Railway, Cranbrook and Paddock Wood Railway, London and Greenwich Railway, Croydon & Oxted Joint Railway and Dover & Deal Railway, were also included, as was the Lynton and Barnstaple Railway although not covered by the Railways Act 1921, it had been absorbed by the LSWR.

The Southern Railway also was to share or jointly operate a number of lines including: the East London Railway, West London Extension Railway, Weymouth & Portland Railway and of course the Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway.

The Southern Railway Network

The total route mileage owned whole by the Southern Railway at Grouping was 2,186 miles, with the main constituents not surprising forming the majority with 1,020 miles ex LSWR, 457 miles ex LBSC and 637 ½ ex SECR. The SR was operated essentially as three Districts: Western, Central and Eastern based approximately on the previous main constituents.

There were two Chief Mechanical Engineers; Richard Maunsell, ex SECR, between 1923 and 1937 and Oliver Vaughan Snell Bulleid, ex GN / LNER, from 1937 to 1948.

And just because you can never have enough Bulleid pacifics or Southern malachite green…

Although originally three general managers were appointed from each of the main constituents, with a year Sir Herbert Walker became the single General Manager and the development of the SR was built upon many of his ex LSWR practices. Following his retirement in 1937 he was succeeded as general manager by his long-time assistant Gilbert Szlumper. In 1939, Szlumper left the Southern Railway for war service and Sir Eustace Missenden took over.

The Southern Railway officially lasted, of course until Nationalisation in 1948, although in reality, just as during the First World War, the Railways due to the outbreak of The Second World War were taken once again under Government control via The Railway Executive on 1st September 1939 and would remain so until the 1st January 1948 becoming the Southern Region of British Railways.

With the passing of the Transport Act 1947 that nationalised the Railways, Missenden became the first Chairman of the Railway Executive and John Elliot became acting General Manager of the SR and would later become Chief Regional Officer of the Southern Region of British Railways.

I hope this brief simplified history of the Southern Railway has been of interest, and appropriate to mark the 100 years since its formation. I thought it was about time that it was included on my corner of the blogsphere!

Wishing you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

Merry Christmas to you all, fill up your life with love, compassion, tolerance, peace, happiness and perhaps hopefully some time for modelling.

It looks a lot like snow at Canute Road Quay…
The SR 1924 Christmas advert

The wonderful Southern Railway Christmas press advert from December 1924 seen left (click for a larger version) was recently unearthed by friend and Railway Historian Dr, David Turner, and is a fascinating glimpse back to a different, possibly non striking, time.
I love the promise of “Jolly Parties at the seaside”, I know “summer comes soonest in the south” but that must have been optimistic in December? A neat use of the holly leaves to show the list of Southern Railway served seaside destinations…

As the festive season and New Year break is upon us, I just wanted to say many thanks to all of you whom have taken the time to read my ramblings over the past 12 months. I hope you have found such ramblings interesting and informative.  I have always enjoyed corresponding with many of you that have made contact me via email or the comments field on my various posts. I look forward to corresponding with you again in the New Year and maybe in person at an exhibition…

A further flurry of activity will be taking place at the start of the new year with Hornby (January 10th we beleive) announcing its 2022 range followed a few weeks later, at the beginning of February, by Bachmann making the next of their now quarterly range announcements.  I will as always bring you all the Southern Railway / Southern Region related news on here as soon as their announcements are made.

Seasons greetings, whatever your faith or beliefs, Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year (or Nadelik Lowen ha Blydhen Nowydh Da! from the boss’ side of the Tamar) to you all! 

The 00 gauge model wish list poll for 2022 is now open

The not so annual 00 gauge wish list poll has gone live today and runs until 1800 on Friday 30 December. The team last ran The 00 Wishlist Poll back in autumn 2019. They listed over 800 items together with a massive Poll Guide and it simply became unsustainable – for many reasons – to maintain that format. However, some of those reasons have ‘dissipated’ and we have seen a number of model companies appear over the horizon. Therefore it was felt that a revamped version (but without The Guide) would be fun to run.

The purpose of The Poll is to provide an easy way for modellers and collectors to tell the major manufacturers and commissioners of ready-to-run railway models what they would like to see made from new tooling (excluding models announced, tooled or made since 2005). It should be noted that the poll is only being run for 00 gauge models. There are plenty of Southern Railway / Southern Region related items to vote for, hint hint.

Voting covers steam, diesel and electric locos; DMUs; EMUs; passenger and non-passenger-carrying coaching stock; freight and departmental stock see here The Contents of The 00 Wishlist Poll 2022

For those looking for a an N Gauge poll our friends at N Gauge News are running a Christmas Diesel and Electric wish lish poll at the moment and you can take part here…

A full report of the results will be published on RMweb from early January and no doubt in a number of magazines along with a summary of the Southern / Southern Region related results on this blog.

Make your vote count and vote Southern…!

Going dumb… with 247 Developments vertical buffers.

Many early and or industrial rolling stock including both wagons and locomotives had very primitive ‘dumb’ buffers often fashioned from wooden blocks. I had previously created this on a couple of the industrial locomotives sometimes seen on Canute Road Quay such as the Hatton’s Andrew Barclay 14″ 0-6-0t and Hornby W4 Peckett 0-4-0t and this simple conversion can be read about here.

For some of the even earlier wagon designs, such as the delightfully small ‘Chaldron’ wagons now available from Accurascale their size meant that there wooden ‘buffers’ were both lower and closer together than the ‘normal’ adopted buffer position. This meant that for shunting to easily and safely be undertaken the locomotives being used required additional buffering arrangements to be added.
This usually took the form of vertically mounted wooden blocks that were simply / crudely bolted onto the locomotive buffer beam.

B2 Peckett 0-6-0t ‘Leader’ fitted with the 247 Developments dumb buffers

My friends at 247 Developments have created 3D printed vertical dumb buffers available in sets of four either painted (£2.50) or unpainted (£1.00).
These can be simply glued to the buffer beam (I advise just removing any raised rivet from the buffer beam at the mounting position first) providing a dumb buffer solution in a matter of minutes at a pocket money price.
Even without the Chaldron wagons the additional dumb buffers add some further character and individualism to the industrial locomotive fleet.

247 Developments are of course also a great port of call for etched number and nameplates, SR Head signal discs and a wide range of locomotive, coach and wagon detailing parts.

Hornby 75T Crane legs

Continuing the 3D printed theme also new to the 247 Developments range are both short (£1.50) and long (£2.50) legs for the venerable Hornby Cowans Sheldon 75T Breakdown crane (similar to the one based for a while at Eastleigh).

 

 

The model railway world and mainly Southern Railway meanderings of Graham 'Muz' Muspratt

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