Category Archives: General

Hornby announce their 2023 range, a summary of SR/BR(s) items

Hornby have today announced their forthcoming range for 2023 as being a year of catch up, so not a huge amount to report for SR / BR(s) modellers (or anyone really…unless you are a collector of Gresley pacifics).

New Tooling

Hornby’s new tooling for 2023 is not SR / BR(s) orientated and includes the LNER streamlined 4-6-0 B17/5 locomotive, no new coach tooling and the following wagons: GWR Macaw B / BR Bogie Bolster C, BR TTA tank wagon and LMS/ BR Salmon/YMO bogie wagon.  The LNER A1/A3 and prototype DELTIC are added to the Hornby Dublo diecast range.

Locomotives

The 100th anniversary of Grouping occurring at the start of this January is marked by the limited edition, (500 each model) “Big Four Centenary Collection” of one loco representing each of the big four, but being due in October…

With no new tooling of any kind for Southern modelers we see only the following two steam locomotive livery releases:

  • R30273 SR N15 ‘King Arthur Class’ 4-6-0 741 ‘Joyous Gard’ – Limited Edition – Big Four Centenary Collection – in Maunsell olive green livery as she was between June 1925 when named and January 1928 when fitted with smoke deflectors  – Era 3 – Due Oct 2023

  • R3860 BR Merchant Navy Class 4-6-2 35012 ‘United States Lines’ – in malachite green with wedge shaped cab, Gills Sans BR numerals as carried between March 1949 and January 1951 – Era 4 – Due Oct 2023

  • R30176TXS Railroad Plus GB Railfreight Class 73 Bo-Bo 73109 ‘Battle of Britain’ – Sound fitted – Era 10 – Due Nov 2023

And for Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway modellers as it was jointly run by the SR and LSWR before it and I am not just trying to fill the page honest:

  • R30285 S&DJR Blue Class 4F 0-6-0 No. 61 – Era 2 – Due Dec 2023
  • R30286 S&DJR Blue Class 2P 4-4-0 No. 46 – Era 2 – Due Dec 2023
  • R30316 RailRoad S&DJR Blue, Class 3F ‘Jinty’, 0-6-0, No. 20 Blue – Era 2 – Due August 2023
  • R30325 RailRoad S&DJR Black, Class 3F ‘Jinty’, 0-6-0, No. 25 – Era 2 – Due August 2023

Yep… that’s all folks… really no other SR/BR(s) model locos, coaches or wagons in the 2023 range!

In reality with quite a number of last years range and some still from 2021 to be delivered, along with the TT:120 investment that has taken place, it is perhaps not surprising that a more manageable scaled back, catch up, 2023 range has been announced.

Watch the full Hornby announcement video here.

However… there is a potential new ‘Generic’ Railroad 0-4-0t locomotive that might just have a passing resemblance to an Adams B4 (but stick with the Dapol version!) It should also be noted that the catalogue when it arrives may include some models that have not been included in today’s announcement and will not be available this year.

The ‘full’ Hornby 2023 range can be found on the Hornby website here of the RMweb forum here.  You can pre-order items from retailers such as Kernow Model Rail Centre here…

Marking 100 years since the formation of the Southern Railway – a potted history

It would be remiss of me not to mark the fact that today is 100 years since the Grouping and the formation of the Southern Railway, it also of course marks the demise of its constituent companies. This post attempts to provide a simplified potted history of the Grouping and the Southern Railway.

The Southern Railway coat of arms incorporated heraldic elements from the main constituent companies.

Although the actual Grouping occurred on 1st January 1923, it’s instigation can be traced back to the First World War where all railways were under state control until 1921. The Railways Act 1921, followed discussions at the time on potential nationalisation, had the aim of stemming the losses being occurred at the time by many of the 120 or so railway companies.

The form of Grouping originally proposed in 1920, by former North Eastern Railway executive, the Minister of Transport, Eric Geddes, was for five English and one Scottish regional companies, by 1921 this was amended to four English and two Scottish companies before the Scottish routes were incorporated in the companies that we know as the ‘Big Four’.  Royal Assent for the Railways Act was in August 1921.

The main Constituent companies of the Southern Railway were the well known three, actually four: The London and South Western Railway (LSWR), The London, Brighton and South Coast Railway (LBSCR) and the combined South Eastern Railway and the London, Chatham and Dover Railway, under the South Eastern & Chatham Railways’ Managing Committee (SECR).

The first SR passenger livery was a continuation of the LSWR style in Olive Green with expanded Clarendon ‘Egyptian’ style ‘Southern’ font as seen on ex LSWR Adams A12 0-4-2. From 1937 the Bulleid malachite green and ‘Sunshine’ lettering as seen on the ex LSWR M7 in the background was introduced.

Also incorporated were the three Isle of Wight railway companies and the Plymouth, Devonport and South Western Junction Railway (Bere Alston and Callington section).
Some non-working or joint companies that had been previously leased or worked by the main constituent companies, including for example (not an exhaustive list): the North Cornwall Railway, Sidmouth Railway, Lee-on-the-Solent Railway, Hayling Railway, Cranbrook and Paddock Wood Railway, London and Greenwich Railway, Croydon & Oxted Joint Railway and Dover & Deal Railway, were also included, as was the Lynton and Barnstaple Railway although not covered by the Railways Act 1921, it had been absorbed by the LSWR.

The Southern Railway also was to share or jointly operate a number of lines including: the East London Railway, West London Extension Railway, Weymouth & Portland Railway and of course the Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway.

The Southern Railway Network

The total route mileage owned whole by the Southern Railway at Grouping was 2,186 miles, with the main constituents not surprising forming the majority with 1,020 miles ex LSWR, 457 miles ex LBSC and 637 ½ ex SECR. The SR was operated essentially as three Districts: Western, Central and Eastern based approximately on the previous main constituents.

There were two Chief Mechanical Engineers; Richard Maunsell, ex SECR, between 1923 and 1937 and Oliver Vaughan Snell Bulleid, ex GN / LNER, from 1937 to 1948.

And just because you can never have enough Bulleid pacifics or Southern malachite green…

Although originally three general managers were appointed from each of the main constituents, with a year Sir Herbert Walker became the single General Manager and the development of the SR was built upon many of his ex LSWR practices. Following his retirement in 1937 he was succeeded as general manager by his long-time assistant Gilbert Szlumper. In 1939, Szlumper left the Southern Railway for war service and Sir Eustace Missenden took over.

The Southern Railway officially lasted, of course until Nationalisation in 1948, although in reality, just as during the First World War, the Railways due to the outbreak of The Second World War were taken once again under Government control via The Railway Executive on 1st September 1939 and would remain so until the 1st January 1948 becoming the Southern Region of British Railways.

With the passing of the Transport Act 1947 that nationalised the Railways, Missenden became the first Chairman of the Railway Executive and John Elliot became acting General Manager of the SR and would later become Chief Regional Officer of the Southern Region of British Railways.

I hope this brief simplified history of the Southern Railway has been of interest, and appropriate to mark the 100 years since its formation. I thought it was about time that it was included on my corner of the blogsphere!

Wishing you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

Merry Christmas to you all, fill up your life with love, compassion, tolerance, peace, happiness and perhaps hopefully some time for modelling.

It looks a lot like snow at Canute Road Quay…
The SR 1924 Christmas advert

The wonderful Southern Railway Christmas press advert from December 1924 seen left (click for a larger version) was recently unearthed by friend and Railway Historian Dr, David Turner, and is a fascinating glimpse back to a different, possibly non striking, time.
I love the promise of “Jolly Parties at the seaside”, I know “summer comes soonest in the south” but that must have been optimistic in December? A neat use of the holly leaves to show the list of Southern Railway served seaside destinations…

As the festive season and New Year break is upon us, I just wanted to say many thanks to all of you whom have taken the time to read my ramblings over the past 12 months. I hope you have found such ramblings interesting and informative.  I have always enjoyed corresponding with many of you that have made contact me via email or the comments field on my various posts. I look forward to corresponding with you again in the New Year and maybe in person at an exhibition…

A further flurry of activity will be taking place at the start of the new year with Hornby (January 10th we beleive) announcing its 2022 range followed a few weeks later, at the beginning of February, by Bachmann making the next of their now quarterly range announcements.  I will as always bring you all the Southern Railway / Southern Region related news on here as soon as their announcements are made.

Seasons greetings, whatever your faith or beliefs, Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year (or Nadelik Lowen ha Blydhen Nowydh Da! from the boss’ side of the Tamar) to you all! 

Workbench Witterings #18 Not a pane yet, Westhill Road’s station building takes shape

Has it really been August since my Workbench Witterings#16 The Foundations of the Westhill Road station building? I have at last been able to do some more work on it today, starting with a the upper floor windows.

Making the window sections old school…

As I have been unable to find any proprietary windows from the usual sources, including from laser cut suppliers that were the correct size for these distinctive upper windows (the ground floor window are from the PECO LK-78 building kit-1), I resorted to the old school method using various sizes of microstrip.
I have actually used the centre section of some Ratio signal box windows (whispers quietly GWR ones…) that were the right height, but too wide, so have reduced their width and added new edge verticals. To aid production I make up little jigs from the versatile wooden coffee stirrer screwed to a piece of MDF.

The completed 3 and 5 section main windows

Once I had made enough main six pane sections, I joined them together with additional verticals between them, and complete outer frames to make the required three and five section main windows. Once fully assembled they make up into quite strong assemblies. I also used the same technique to make the smaller side landing window. 
With the windows made, although they won’t be glazed until after painting, I was then able to complete the rendered upper wall sections (a characteristic of the mirrored inspiration of Alverstone, for this build)

The shell of the building takes shape, the two doors, the middle for the ticket hall and right hand one for private access can be seen

The shell of the main building was then assembled around the internal lower floor, that has been cut square and allowing for the wall material thickness, and its internal partition walls. The corners are chamfered to an angle greater than 45deg to get sharp corner joints and further reinforced behind with lengths of triangular section.
On the Alverstone station building being used for inspiration there is a shaped brick moulding that runs horizontally between the lower brick and upper rendered walls along with the the very bottom edge of the rendered walls sloping outwards to deflect rainwater away from getting in along bottom edge of the render. I have used half round microstrip and 10thou thin flat strip at an angle above it to represent these features.

The rear of the station building

The approximate internal layout has been worked out for both floors.  The ground floor, as at Alverstone has a small ticket hall with passenger being able to access just the ticket window via the middle door. This is one of the interesting features of this combined station ticket office / station masters house whilst not actually on the platform is one of the quirks that attracted me to using it as the basis for the station building on Westhill Road.
The door next to the ticket hall is the private station house access opening into a lounge, whilst at the rear is a kitchen that in turn gives access to the ticket office and the stairs. Two bedrooms and a bath room complete the upper floor rooms. 

A view inside with the upper floor removed

All the internal walls, fireplaces and chimney breasts etc. have been created from plasticard, representations of the door frames have also added with plastic microstrip. The upper floor is currently removable to allow access inside for painting etc. 

As the building will be internally lit, the central chimney will allow the wires to be hidden down the inside, all the rooms will have a representation of furniture etc. included. I have sourced some suitable 3D printed items to use as a basis and these will be painted and added in due course along with a few suitably posed figures.
I am still planning to make the roof as a separate module so it can always be removed if required, so watch this space for the next instalment… 

When You Go Home, Tell Them Of Us And Say, For Their Tomorrow, We Gave Our Today #Remembrance #lestweforget

If you so wish, wear your poppy with pride today, pause respectfully for two minutes at 11 am this Armistice Day and again this Remembrance Sunday remembering all those, both service and civilian personnel whom have given their lives for the freedom that we all enjoy today, and should you feel so inclined, support the sterling work of the Royal British Legion.

This post is written to not only commemorate the fallen service personal from any conflict, but it is also, as in previous years, dedicated to all Railway companies across the country and indeed the world that lost many staff; not only those drafted into the military services, but also those lost whom continued their duties on the railways keeping the networks up and running, we should honour and remember them all.

When You Go Home,
Tell Them Of Us And Say, For Their Tomorrow,
We Gave Our Today

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.

Locomotive 333 was built originally by the London Brighton and South Coast Railway, designed by Billinton, as an L class 4-6-4 ‘Baltic’ tank. She was given the name Remembrance and became the companies War Memorial engine and carried a plaque with the inscription:

“In grateful remembrance of the 532 men of the L.B.& S.C.Rly. who gave their lives for their country, 1914-1919″

In 1934, under the auspices of Maunsell they were rebuilt as Class N15x (an appropriate Brighton-style suffix) 4-6-0s, and fitted with standard Urie LSWR tenders along with smoke deflectors. Now number 2333 ‘Remembrance’ retained its name, plaque and status within the Southern Railway.

Inscribed on James Scott’s Victory Arch, at Waterloo station: “Dedicated to the employees of the Company who fell in the war.” and the names of those London and South Western employees who gave their life are honoured within the arch.

And just to end this post, as written by Paul Hunter – the poppy is more than a one time of a year symbol:, 

I am not a badge of honour, I am not a racist smear,
I am not a fashion statement, to be worn but once a year,
I am not glorification of conflict or of war.
I am not a paper ornament a token,
I am more.

I am a loving memory, Of a father or a son,
a permanent reminder of each and every one. 
I’m paper or enamel, I’m old or shining new,
I’m a way of saying thank you, To every one of you.

I am a simple poppy, a reminder to you all,
That courage faith and honour,
will stand where heroes of all kinds fall.

Trains Times Model Shop exclusive Rapido Trains UK LB&SCR E1 0-6-0 locomotive identities revealed

Further to my post last month where Rapido Trains UK revealed the versions of the LBSC E1 class 0-6-0 tank locomotives they are producing, it also advised that Train Times of Eastbourne announced a exclusive livery versions for the Rapido Trains UK LB&SCR E1 in LBSC Lined Black .

E1 Class 113

Train Times have today revealed the identities for the two exclusive models they have commissioned both in LBSC lined black livery.  They will be producing number 113 which spent some time at Eastbourne in the 1910s and “Loco Dept. New Cross”.

Number 113 originally built in May 1877 named “Granville” carried this lined black livery from 1906 until 1928 when she was repainted into Southern livery and numbered B113. She latter became 2113 then 32113 and was withdrawn September 1958 having worked 1,130,888 miles!

E1 Class “Loco Dept. New Cross”

Number 111 originally built in April 1877 named “Montpelier” and became “Loco Dept. New Cross” from June 1908 until June 1922 when she was renumbered 611 and withdrawn in May 1932.

Both versions are a limited to 150 models and will be priced at £164.95 and available to pre-order from the Train Times website here. 

 

Ch-ch-changes, Turn and face the (s)train…

With apologies to David Bowie… regular readers may have spotted a slight change to the layout of my little corner of the world wide web.  The previous WordPress theme (page style) I was using had become obsolete and was causing a few back office and functionality issues, so I therefore have adopted a new WordPress theme that hopefully solves some of the issues and gives a similar but slightly fresher look.

The downside, and there is always a downside of course, is that the positioning of images, annoyingly, align differently and so has affected the visual appearance of previous posts. Please bear with me and accept my apologies as I either find a work around and / or slowly manually correct past posts.

USA Tank No 68 shunts across the Quay.

In other news, Canute Road Quay is on the road again next month and is appearing on Saturday 20th August 2022 at the Silverfox DCC MRC exhibition being held at the Oakgrove School, Venturer Gate, Milton Keynes MK10 9JQ

It is good to be at exhibitions again, especially as many Model Railway Clubs/Societies have lost such valuable income from the lack of exhibitions during the pandemic,  so if you are able to visit the show, and support the Silverfox DCC MRC, please drop by Canute Road Quay and say hello.