Tag Archives: Canute Road Quay

Astolat Guildford Exhibition – Sunday 16th Jan is GOING AHEAD – See Canute Road Quay

I am pleased to advise that the Astolat Model Railway Circle exhibition on Sunday 16th January is GOING AHEAD which makes a welcome change at a time that has seen many shows cancelled. I look forward to attending this pleasant show with Canute Road Quay. Please come along, say hello and support the Astolat MRC.

See Canute Road Quay at the Astolat Guildford show on Sunday 16th January

The show is being held at the Surrey Sports Park, University of Surrey, Richard Meyjes Road, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7AD

Doors open at 10:00 am and close at 5:00pm. Entry prices are £6.00 for Adult, £3.00 for Child (under 14) and £12.00 for family (2 + 2).

Important Covid Advisory Information.
In light of the latest government guidelines all adult visitors to the January exhibition will sensibly be required to wear masks and will require evidence of at least double vaccination or proof of a recent negative Lateral Flow Test to gain entry to the Surrey Sports Park buildings.

Obviously things and or any requirements still might change, so I advise checking the Astolat Model Railway Circle exhibition website here  before setting out to visit the show but I  look forward to hopefully seeing you there.  As well as the show, whilst in Guildford you can also check out the nearby Kernow Model Rail Centre Guildford shop see here for details.

Canute Road Quay – Exhibition update – Stafford Railway Circle Exhibition 5th & 6th February Cancelled

I have been advised that the Stafford Railway Circle Exhibition that Canute Road Quay was due to attend on 5th & 6th February 2022 has been unfortunately cancelled.

The show organisers have advised: “In view of the rapidly worsening Covid situation caused by the Omicron variant, Stafford Railway Circle has decided that it is not possible to proceed with this exhibition. We deeply regret that we have to cancel it and hope that our exhibitors, traders and would-be customers will understand why this decision has been taken. Our sincere apologies but hopefully you understand.”

Unfortunate but understandable, I hope to be there in 2023.

Canute Road Quay is also scheduled to be at the Astolat Model Railway Circle exhibition in Guildford on Sunday 16th January 2022, I am aware that the organisers are monitoring the current situation and will advise further in due course.

Westhill Road, an introduction #1

It is about time that I formally introduced you to Westhill Road there has been a teaser page on here for quite some time, as with many plans timing has slipped somewhat from the original intention of it being a post-Christmas last year winter project. However with much of the items needed for its construction already purchased I plan to hopefully start building in earnest during these forthcoming winter months.

Whilst I still have plans for larger layouts, perhaps maybe for the future, space at this time is still a limiting factor.  The plans still include Hawkhurst in Kent, the Colonel Stevens SR branch line terminus, but ultimately Lydford Junction in Devon on the edge of Dartmoor.
Most of my rolling stock building has always been with these two layouts in mind, and believe it or not Fisherton Sarum was my first ever layout build and initially only to be a stop gap measure…
Some of the buildings that I have already built for these future layouts will actually make a temporary appearance on Westhill Road. Having already built Canute Road Quay as a 4′ x 12″ shunting layout, that has already provided endless entertainment and enjoyment in both its building an operation, I saw the opportunity for another small layout/diorama that has more of a scenic countryside than the dockside setting of Canute Road Quay.
So I will introduce Westhill Road over the next few posts that will will answer the usual questions of what, why, how and when…
Firstly, the what and a little of the why…
Westhill Road will be different from Canute Road Quay as it’s more of a diorama than a shunting layout as such,  but mainly a chance to enjoy the more scenic side of constructing a layout.

A hint of what is to come…

Westhill Road signal diagram

The Tim Horn baseboard will still be 4ft wide but will be 6″ deeper Canute Road Quay to help, along with some perspective modelling, to further create the illusion of space and depth. It will only comprise of a single track line passing from left-hand rear corner, through a small SR Concrete wayside halt, a single goods siding and a level crossing before exiting through to the front right hand corner. Careful placement of trees will assist to hide the entrance and exit points.

The layout will include working, servo operated SR rail built signals and level crossing gates, all interlocked with each other and the co-acting siding turnout and trap point, see the signal diagram left.

A future post will provide more details of the intended scenic side of things.

Now a bit of the why, starting with why Westhill Road? Fisherton Sarum has a huge nod to my grandfather who worked as a ganger at Salisbury where my father was also bought up.  Westhill Road is a nod to my Mothers side of the family where I spent some of my formative years in Torquay at my grandparents who lived on Westhill Road.

Westhill Road therefore has no real railway connection or real setting; it could be somewhere west of Dartmoor; you could equally be somewhere on the Isle of Wight railway network or perhaps even somewhere in Kent. So yes an imaginary location and initially it will be a diorama, although ultimately I do intend to have simple fiddle yards at each end but these won’t be part of phase one. The initial purpose it to build something that has scenery at its forefront and allow me to test and experiment with different scenic techniques, perspective to create depth and the, new to me, use of servo motors.

It will also give me a a different scenic setting for photographing locomotives and rolling stock; and much of the placement of buildings and the many planned trees will be with allowing view points in mind, as you look into and through the layout.

Future posts will cover much more of the what and some of the when; and will of course also document the progress of Westhill Road as I go along, so watch this space…

From the archive #4 The quay to making puddles and something about gulls…

Although it could be said that I cheated with Canute Road Quay when I modelled the quayside wall as part of the front facia of the layout; this was not to avoid having to create the water but in fact to maximise the space available with a 12 inch deep baseboard.

One of the puddles has attracted the attention of Gerald the Gull

Another quayside puddle and gull some gloss varnish add to the effect of some water running by the edge of the concrete

Step 4, The scenery or ballast is added to form the edge of the puddles

The finished effect including a larger puddle in the shed area due to the water crane

large and small gulls can be seen if you look close enough

A real life Gerard who misread the sign, he thought it said “free herring test”

There are however a number of representations of water on Canute Road Quay in the form of a few puddles, this post is a quick explanation of the method I used to create the effect of standing water.

Note: the initial steps are carried out before any nearby ballasting or scenic work is carried out, so needs a bit of forward planning / vison of where puddles might naturally occur, remembering that puddles will only form in depressions, hollows, ditches and low points and water finds a horizontal level and wont form on a slope!

Step one, is to paint one side of a thin sheet of clear plasticard with gloss black paint, I used good old Humbrol enamel. It’s a good way to use up a few offcuts.

Step two, cut the now painted plasticard into the rough shape, but wider and longer than the maximum length and width, of the area of the puddle you want to create.

Step three, glue the plasticard paint side down, i.e. the clear plasticard side up, in the location you want the puddle.

Step four, start to build up the required terrain, at this stage you create the final shape of the puddles which is why the plasticard is cut larger than the size of puddle you want and so the terrain edge is on the surface of the plasticard. I generally used Daz air drying modelling clay, see picture left, and used the terracotta colour rather then white or grey so it already has an earth like base colour. In and around the shed area I used a mix of ballast and real ash from my wood burning stove.

Step five, add the foliage as required, I used a variety of lengths of static grass, using the lighter greens and straw colours as wild grass is rarely dark green. In some areas I represented wet earth / concrete using some gloss varnish.

Step six, remember to dust the puddles every now and again, especially before taking any photographs…

Some people have occasionally mentioned the size of the some of the ‘seagulls’, of course they are not seagulls but Herring Gulls and I have used those available from Springside Models. If you want to really see just how bit a real life adult Herring Gulls stand at the sea side with an open bag of chips you will soon find they are much larger than you think!

I have used both their 4mm scale  versions and at the rear of the layout a number of their 2mm versions to assist with perspective. Those on the backscene were drawn on in flight as curly ‘W’s with a pencil.

Gerard the Gull was not so much wild when I glued him place but furious… (with apologies to Not the Nine o’clock News…)

And I didn’t even mention ‘The Gulls’… oh Doh! #COYY