Tag Archives: LMS

Heljan shows Engineering Prototype of North British / Ivatt 10800 ‘wonder engine’ diesel in 00

Heljan first announced that they were to produce the North British 10800 800hp prototype diesel only in February this year, at this weekends DEMU Showcase exhibition they showed an Engineering Prototype (EP).

Heljan 10800 RH side view

As I stated and detailed in my post in February 10800 is not strictly a Southern Region Locomotive, however 10800 did see trials on the Southern Region in 1952. Known by many of the Southern Region steam enginemen on the Central section at the time as the “Wonder Engine” from the locomotive department’s daily query “I wonder if it will go today” due to its poor reliability record and the fact that it spent more time in the works being repaired than actually working trains.

Heljan 10800 EP left hand side view (the vents on the lower bonnet side doors can be seen)

The Heljan model includes: etched metal parts, working marker and cab lights, 21-pin DCC interface, DCC sound provision, sprung buffers and all-wheel drive/pick-up.

Four versions will be available on general release depicting 10800 in different stages of its life, but annoyingly from a Southern Region modellers perspective not as originally built without the lower bonnet door vents as she ran for the majority her time on the Southern Region. The models are priced with an RRP of £234.95 each.

Heljan EP side view
  • 1080 BR Early Emblem Black/Silver 10800 (SR/LMR post February 1954 condition)
  • 1081 BR Early Emblem Black 10800 (SR/LMR condition) WEATHERED
  • 1082 BR Early Emblem Black/Silver 10800 (final BR condition)
  • 1083 BR Late Crest Green 10800

Delivery is expected during 2023.

These will be available via your usual Heljan Retailers such as KMRC.

Heljan unveils North British / Ivatt 10800 ‘wonder engine’ diesel in 00

Heljan have today announced they are to produce the North British 10800 800hp prototype diesel.
Although not strictly a Southern Region Locomotive, 10800 did see trials on the Southern Region in 1952, as described below. Known by many of the Southern Region steam enginemen on the Central section at the time as the “Wonder Engine” from the locomotive department’s daily query “I wonder if it will go today” due to its poor reliability record and the fact that it spent more time in the works being repaired than actually working trains.

10800 at NBL Works [GRM Collection]
It was originally conceived by H.G Ivatt of the London Midland & Scottish Railway in 1945, who wanted a basic design for an 800hp diesel-electric loco for comparison with similar output steam traction on secondary and branch lines. The order was placed by the LMSR with the North British Locomotive Co of Glasgow, in 1946, to produce a loco to their design. Ivatt’s design was for a Bo-Bo wheel configuration with the cab slightly set in at one end.

The cab was arranged to enable the driver to face the direction of travel and therefore duplicate controls were fitted. The power unit

used was a Davey Paxman 16 RPHXL Mk2 engine that drove an 800hp British Thompson-Houston main generator and traction motors.

The loco was constructed in 1948-50 and when completed carried the BR number 10800. The livery applied was the then British Railways standard for its diesel fleet of black with silver bogies. When complete Nº10800 underwent testing in Scotland and after a few months was allocated to the LMR at Willesden from where it operated tests in the London area.

10800 [GRM Collection]
In July/August 1952 it was allocated to Southern Region at Norwood. The shed being chosen one would suspect due to the fact that it already had diesel refuelling facilities owing to its fleet of diesel shunters although, as described below, it also spent a lot of its time at Brighton works. The first test run of 10800 on the Southern Region was a 165 ton train 10:45 am from London Bridge to Tonbridge Wells West via Oxted and East Grinstead (High level) and return at 1:08pm on 13th August 1952. From 18th August 1952 it was allocated Norwood duty 610 which involved services such as the 5.08am London Bridge to Brighton via Dorking, Horsham and Steyning; the 10.18am Brighton to Victoria and 3.52pm return (both via Oxted and Eridge); the 6.49pm Brighton to Tonbridge Wells West and the 9.01pm onwards to Victoria; the 11.04pm Victoria to Oxted (Wednesdays and Saturdays excepted) or East Grinstead (Wednesdays and Saturdays only).

The trials also showed that Nº10800 was underpowered, so much so that time was lost on the banks with even a modest six coach load.

Heljan Cad render, shows the additional two mid height lamp irons added when tested on the SR

It was often found wanting and more often than not, was replaced by steam. In October 1952 it was taken off passenger work and switched to freight workings from Norwood to Purley. Its first visit to Brighton works was for nine days from 5 November 1952 where they carried out a light casual repair (costing only £23) at which point 10800 had completed 58,228 miles. The reliability of Nº10800 was poor, it was active for short spells during January and April 1953 but from 29th June 1953 until 6th February 1954 Brighton works tried to put right the faults that had so far blighted her career. They spent according to official documentation £1,357. On 25th January 1954, whilst still officially in the care of Brighton Works, she worked an eight coach trial train from Brighton to East Croydon and back via Uckfield and Oxted. Initially on first returning to Norwood on 6th February she was put onto freight workings. It did, however, take up working the Norwood 610 duty again from 9th February 1954. The locomotive failed totally at Streatham Common on 30th March whilst working the 3.52pm Victoria to Brighton service and had to be towed to Norwood from where it was then towed via Oxted and Sheffield Park to Brighton Works on 6th April where the repairs to the badly damaged diesel engine took until the beginning of December to complete. She had only completed a further 8,172 miles since being released back into service in February and would be destined to stay in Brighton Works for 210 days whilst a further £404 was spent on various repairs.

Cad render 10800 rear right side

Following its less than spectacular testing on the Southern Region, its recorded mileage being the lowest at anytime during its short life, on 11 December 1954 it was allocated to Plaistow shed on the ER for further testing. It was withdrawn in August 1959 and stored at Doncaster Works. Then in 1961 Brush of Loughborough were seeking a loco for experimental traction purposes and Nº10800 filled the role adequately so was sold to Brush in 1962. Following rebuilding, Nº10800 was tested by British Railways at the Rugby test plant and on the GC Leicester-Nottingham route. In this guise Nº10800 received a green and brown livery. The body was finally broken up in 1972-73.

10800 rear left side

The Heljan model includes: etched metal parts, working marker and cab lights, 21-pin DCC interface, DCC sound provision, sprung buffers and all-wheel drive/pick-up.
Based on original NBL drawings and research CAD work is complete and tooling is now well underway.
Four versions will be available on general release depicting 10800 in different stages of its life (but not as originally built without the lower bonnet door vents), priced at an RRP of £234.95 each.

  • 1080 BR Early Emblem Black/Silver 10800 (SR/LMR post February 1954 condition)
  • 1081 BR Early Emblem Black 10800 (SR/LMR condition) WEATHERED
  • 1082 BR Early Emblem Black/Silver 10800 (final BR condition)
  • 1083 BR Late Crest Green 10800

Delivery is expected in 2023.

Heljan have a track record of producing such one off prototypes and this is a loco I have been thinking of trying to model, due to its Southern Region connection, for some time so will be a welcome addition to my fleet. These will be available via your usual Heljan Retailers such as KMRC.

Operation Dynamo; not just small ships…the Southern Railway played its part…80 years on

Following on from marking the 75th anniversary of Victory in Europe day earlier this month on 8th May, today marks 80 years on since the evacuation of Allied soldiers commenced from the beaches and harbour of Dunkirk, France, between 26 May and 4 June 1940. This is essentially a repost from 5 years ago but the sentiment remains true and strong.
The Dunkirk evacuation, code named Operation Dynamo, was decided upon when large numbers of British, French, and Belgian troops were cut off and surrounded by the German army. The event is renown for the use of a flotilla of 800 small ships used to assist in the ferrying of some 338,226 soldiers to safety.

The Southern Railway played very much an unsung role in Operation Dynamo, as once back on English shores the soldiers that did not require immediate hospitalisation or were already based at local South Eastern England barracks were dispersed across England away from the main reception ports of Margate, Ramsgate, Folkestone, Dover, and Newhaven. During the nine period of Operation Dynamo the Southern Railway laid on and coordinated an amazing number of special trains comprising of : 327 from Dover, 82 from Ramsgate, 75 from Margate 64 from Folkestone and also 21 ambulance trains.
These trains, known as ‘Dynamo Specials’ moved 180,982 troops, many of these services were routed via  Redhill, Guildford and Reading, in order to bypass the capital and avoid congestion. Where possible during this period the Southern Railway maintained its usual passenger services with the except of some ‘omnibus replacement services’ to free the most heavily utilised routes between Guildford, Redhill and Tonbridge. Not only was coordination required of the departing trains but also the routing of the return empty stock workings and the necessary prepared engines required to keep the transportation of soldiers as quick and efficient as possible.

The Southern Railway mustered at very short notice nearly 2000 additional carriages, many borrowed from other railway companies including 47 complete rakes from the LNER, 44 from the LMS and 40 from the GWR.  Also 180 engines and crews were required from across the network, to operate these services.

To avoid delay at Dover and Ramsgate it was decided that the soldiers, many of whom had not eaten properly for days, would be fed on the trains. Just simply feeding the men provided Southern Railway with a major logistical problem,  therefore certain rail stations were designated feeding stations. These stations included Headcorn, Tonbridge and Paddock Wood Although the Royal Army Service Corps were primarily responsible many local Women’s Voluntary Service members were involved to provide food and drink, much of which was also donated or paid for with monies rasied from the local communities. Due to the number of trains involved only an eight-minute stop for soldiers to be provide with food and drink that bearing in mind this could have been 550 per train, was again an impressive feat.  Trains often had to pull into a siding at these food stops to ensure that any ambulance trains had priority over the use of the main lines.

Given that Southern Railway had practically no time to organise and plan such an activity, what it achieved without the use of modern day communication systems was very impressive; improvisation and word of mouth were the order of the day. One unknown Army general was famously heard to say: “I wish the Army could operate with as few written instructions as Southern Railway does in an emergency.”

The Southern Railway, as well as coping with troops from Dunkirk, was also evacuating no less than 48,000 school children from the coastal areas due to fear of a German invasion. It should not go unmentioned that a number of the Southern Railway’s shipping fleet and crew, varying from cross channel passenger vessels, Isle of Wight ferries and cargo vessels were actively involved out on the channel itself,  with a number being either badly damaged or lost to enemy action.

We should also pause to remember the 68,000 of our soldiers whom didn’t make it home safely from this particular French campaign.

I hope this post goes just a little way to remember and honour the part that the Southern Railway played in the overall success of Operation Dynamo out of what was a defeat in military terms in Flanders.

 

Picture of the Month – August 2017

This months picture…

Stanier Duchess class No. 46236 ‘City of Bradford’ is turned at Fisherson Sarum during trial runs for the 1948 Locomotive Exchange trials, she is coupled to a WD type tender for the trials due to the SR not having any water troughs.

New Dunkirk film released, time to remember Operation Dynamo; the Southern Railway played its part

This week sees the release of a new blockbuster style film ‘Dunkirk’; directed by Briton Christopher Nolan, whose stars include Mark Rylance, Kenneth Branagh, Tom Hardy and some singer or other Harry Styles (I didn’t think I would ever include his name in a post on here!); is of course about the the evacuation of Allied soldiers from the beaches and harbour of Dunkirk, France, between 27 May and 4 June 1940.
As it is probably not mentioned much in the film (as I have not seen it yet) I thought it would be worth revisiting a past post from May 2015 that commemorated the 75th anniversary of the event and discussed the vital part played by the Southern Railway.
The Dunkirk evacuation, code named Operation Dynamo, was decided upon when large numbers of British, French, and Belgian troops were cut off and surrounded by the German army. The event is renown for the use of a flotilla of 800 small ships used to assist in the ferrying of some 338,226 soldiers to safety.

The Southern Railway played very much an unsung role in Operation Dynamo, as once back on English shores the soldiers that did not require immediate hospitalisation or were already based at local South Eastern England barracks were dispersed across England away from the main reception ports of Margate, Ramsgate, Folkestone, Dover, and Newhaven. During the nine period of Operation Dynamo the Southern Railway laid on and coordinated an amazing number of special trains comprising of : 327 from Dover, 82 from Ramsgate, 75 from Margate 64 from Folkestone and also 21 ambulance trains.
These trains, known as ‘Dynamo Specials’ moved 180,982 troops, many of these services were routed via  Redhill, Guildford and Reading, in order to bypass the capital and avoid congestion. Where possible during this period the Southern Railway maintained its usual passenger services with the except of some ‘omnibus replacement services’ to free the most heavily utilised routes between Guildford, Redhill and Tonbridge. Not only was coordination required of the departing trains but also the routing of the return empty stock workings and the necessary prepared engines required to keep the transportation of soldiers as quick and efficient as possible.

The Southern Railway mustered at very short notice nearly 2000 additional carriages, many borrowed from other railway companies including 47 complete rakes from the LNER, 44 from the LMS and 40 from the GWR.  Also 180 engines and crews were required from across the network, to operate these services.

To avoid delay at Dover and Ramsgate it was decided that the soldiers, many of whom had not eaten properly for days, would be fed on the trains. Just simply feeding the men provided Southern Railway with a major logistical problem,  therefore certain rail stations were designated feeding stations. These stations included Headcorn, Tonbridge and Paddock Wood Although the Royal Army Service Corps were primarily responsible many local Women’s Voluntary Service members were involved to provide food and drink, much of which was also donated or paid for with monies rasied from the local communities. Due to the number of trains involved only an eight-minute stop for soldiers to be provide with food and drink that bearing in mind this could have been 550 per train, was again an impressive feat.  Trains often had to pull into a siding at these food stops to ensure that any ambulance trains had priority over the use of the main lines.

Given that Southern Railway had practically no time to organise and plan such an activity, what it achieved without the use of modern day communication systems was very impressive; improvisation and word of mouth were the order of the day. One unknown Army general was famously heard to say: “I wish the Army could operate with as few written instructions as Southern Railway does in an emergency.”

The Southern Railway, as well as coping with troops from Dunkirk, was also evacuating no less than 48,000 school children from the coastal areas due to fear of a German invasion. It should not go unmentioned that a number of the Southern Railway’s shipping fleet and crew, varying from cross channel passenger vessels, Isle of Wight ferries and cargo vessels were actively involved out on the channel itself,  with a number being either badly damaged or lost to enemy action.

We should also pause to remember the 68,000 of our soldiers whom didn’t make it home safely from this particular French campaign.

I hope this post goes, once again, a little way to remember and honour the part that the Southern Railway played in the overall success of Operation Dynamo out of what was a defeat in military terms in Flanders.

 

Operation Dynamo; not just small ships…the Southern Railway played its part

This weekend sees a number of events taking place to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the evacuation of Allied soldiers from the beaches and harbour of Dunkirk, France, between 27 May and 4 June 1940. The Dunkirk evacuation, code named Operation Dynamo, was decided upon when large numbers of British, French, and Belgian troops were cut off and surrounded by the German army. The event is renown for the use of a flotilla of 800 small ships used to assist in the ferrying of some 338,226 soldiers to safety.

The Southern Railway played very much an unsung role in Operation Dynamo, as once back on English shores the soldiers that did not require immediate hospitalisation or were already based at local South Eastern England barracks were dispersed across England away from the main reception ports of Margate, Ramsgate, Folkestone, Dover, and Newhaven. During the nine period of Operation Dynamo the Southern Railway laid on and coordinated an amazing number of special trains comprising of : 327 from Dover, 82 from Ramsgate, 75 from Margate 64 from Folkestone and also 21 ambulance trains.
These trains, known as ‘Dynamo Specials’ moved 180,982 troops, many of these services were routed via  Redhill, Guildford and Reading, in order to bypass the capital and avoid congestion. Where possible during this period the Southern Railway maintained its usual passenger services with the except of some ‘omnibus replacement services’ to free the most heavily utilised routes between Guildford, Redhill and Tonbridge. Not only was coordination required of the departing trains but also the routing of the return empty stock workings and the necessary prepared engines required to keep the transportation of soldiers as quick and efficient as possible.

The Southern Railway mustered at very short notice nearly 2000 additional carriages, many borrowed from other railway companies including 47 complete rakes from the LNER, 44 from the LMS and 40 from the GWR.  Also 180 engines and crews were required from across the network, to operate these services.

To avoid delay at Dover and Ramsgate it was decided that the soldiers, many of whom had not eaten properly for days, would be fed on the trains. Just simply feeding the men provided Southern Railway with a major logistical problem,  therefore certain rail stations were designated feeding stations. These stations included Headcorn, Tonbridge and Paddock Wood Although the Royal Army Service Corps were primarily responsible many local Women’s Voluntary Service members were involved to provide food and drink, much of which was also donated or paid for with monies rasied from the local communities. Due to the number of trains involved only an eight-minute stop for soldiers to be provide with food and drink that bearing in mind this could have been 550 per train, was again an impressive feat.  Trains often had to pull into a siding at these food stops to ensure that any ambulance trains had priority over the use of the main lines.

Given that Southern Railway had practically no time to organise and plan such an activity, what it achieved without the use of modern day communication systems was very impressive; improvisation and word of mouth were the order of the day. One unknown Army general was famously heard to say: “I wish the Army could operate with as few written instructions as Southern Railway does in an emergency.”

The Southern Railway, as well as coping with troops from Dunkirk, was also evacuating no less than 48,000 school children from the coastal areas due to fear of a German invasion. It should not go unmentioned that a number of the Southern Railway’s shipping fleet and crew, varying from cross channel passenger vessels, Isle of Wight ferries and cargo vessels were actively involved out on the channel itself,  with a number being either badly damaged or lost to enemy action.

We should also pause to remember the 68,000 of our soldiers whom didn’t make it home safely from this particular French campaign.

R3302 1940 Dunkirk train pack

The efforts of the Southern Railway has not gone unnoticed by Hornby who are planning to release this year their R3302 ‘1940 return from Dunkirk’ train pack;  comprising of a ex LSWR Drummond 700 class No. 325 and 3 coach Maunsell low window set No. 447. Unfortunately it does not look like it they have managed to release it to specifically coincide with the actual commemoration weekend but at least the intent is there.

I hope this post goes just a little way to remember and honour the part that the Southern Railway played in the overall success of Operation Dynamo out of what was a defeat in military terms in Flanders.