Tag Archives: lswr

Marking 100 years since the formation of the Southern Railway – a potted history

It would be remiss of me not to mark the fact that today is 100 years since the Grouping and the formation of the Southern Railway, it also of course marks the demise of its constituent companies. This post attempts to provide a simplified potted history of the Grouping and the Southern Railway.

The Southern Railway coat of arms incorporated heraldic elements from the main constituent companies.

Although the actual Grouping occurred on 1st January 1923, it’s instigation can be traced back to the First World War where all railways were under state control until 1921. The Railways Act 1921, followed discussions at the time on potential nationalisation, had the aim of stemming the losses being occurred at the time by many of the 120 or so railway companies.

The form of Grouping originally proposed in 1920, by former North Eastern Railway executive, the Minister of Transport, Eric Geddes, was for five English and one Scottish regional companies, by 1921 this was amended to four English and two Scottish companies before the Scottish routes were incorporated in the companies that we know as the ‘Big Four’.  Royal Assent for the Railways Act was in August 1921.

The main Constituent companies of the Southern Railway were the well known three, actually four: The London and South Western Railway (LSWR), The London, Brighton and South Coast Railway (LBSCR) and the combined South Eastern Railway and the London, Chatham and Dover Railway, under the South Eastern & Chatham Railways’ Managing Committee (SECR).

The first SR passenger livery was a continuation of the LSWR style in Olive Green with expanded Clarendon ‘Egyptian’ style ‘Southern’ font as seen on ex LSWR Adams A12 0-4-2. From 1937 the Bulleid malachite green and ‘Sunshine’ lettering as seen on the ex LSWR M7 in the background was introduced.

Also incorporated were the three Isle of Wight railway companies and the Plymouth, Devonport and South Western Junction Railway (Bere Alston and Callington section).
Some non-working or joint companies that had been previously leased or worked by the main constituent companies, including for example (not an exhaustive list): the North Cornwall Railway, Sidmouth Railway, Lee-on-the-Solent Railway, Hayling Railway, Cranbrook and Paddock Wood Railway, London and Greenwich Railway, Croydon & Oxted Joint Railway and Dover & Deal Railway, were also included, as was the Lynton and Barnstaple Railway although not covered by the Railways Act 1921, it had been absorbed by the LSWR.

The Southern Railway also was to share or jointly operate a number of lines including: the East London Railway, West London Extension Railway, Weymouth & Portland Railway and of course the Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway.

The Southern Railway Network

The total route mileage owned whole by the Southern Railway at Grouping was 2,186 miles, with the main constituents not surprising forming the majority with 1,020 miles ex LSWR, 457 miles ex LBSC and 637 ½ ex SECR. The SR was operated essentially as three Districts: Western, Central and Eastern based approximately on the previous main constituents.

There were two Chief Mechanical Engineers; Richard Maunsell, ex SECR, between 1923 and 1937 and Oliver Vaughan Snell Bulleid, ex GN / LNER, from 1937 to 1948.

And just because you can never have enough Bulleid pacifics or Southern malachite green…

Although originally three general managers were appointed from each of the main constituents, with a year Sir Herbert Walker became the single General Manager and the development of the SR was built upon many of his ex LSWR practices. Following his retirement in 1937 he was succeeded as general manager by his long-time assistant Gilbert Szlumper. In 1939, Szlumper left the Southern Railway for war service and Sir Eustace Missenden took over.

The Southern Railway officially lasted, of course until Nationalisation in 1948, although in reality, just as during the First World War, the Railways due to the outbreak of The Second World War were taken once again under Government control via The Railway Executive on 1st September 1939 and would remain so until the 1st January 1948 becoming the Southern Region of British Railways.

With the passing of the Transport Act 1947 that nationalised the Railways, Missenden became the first Chairman of the Railway Executive and John Elliot became acting General Manager of the SR and would later become Chief Regional Officer of the Southern Region of British Railways.

I hope this brief simplified history of the Southern Railway has been of interest, and appropriate to mark the 100 years since its formation. I thought it was about time that it was included on my corner of the blogsphere!

When You Go Home, Tell Them Of Us And Say, For Their Tomorrow, We Gave Our Today #Remembrance #lestweforget

If you so wish, wear your poppy with pride today, pause respectfully for two minutes at 11 am this Armistice Day and again this Remembrance Sunday remembering all those, both service and civilian personnel whom have given their lives for the freedom that we all enjoy today, and should you feel so inclined, support the sterling work of the Royal British Legion.

This post is written to not only commemorate the fallen service personal from any conflict, but it is also, as in previous years, dedicated to all Railway companies across the country and indeed the world that lost many staff; not only those drafted into the military services, but also those lost whom continued their duties on the railways keeping the networks up and running, we should honour and remember them all.

When You Go Home,
Tell Them Of Us And Say, For Their Tomorrow,
We Gave Our Today

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.

Locomotive 333 was built originally by the London Brighton and South Coast Railway, designed by Billinton, as an L class 4-6-4 ‘Baltic’ tank. She was given the name Remembrance and became the companies War Memorial engine and carried a plaque with the inscription:

“In grateful remembrance of the 532 men of the L.B.& S.C.Rly. who gave their lives for their country, 1914-1919″

In 1934, under the auspices of Maunsell they were rebuilt as Class N15x (an appropriate Brighton-style suffix) 4-6-0s, and fitted with standard Urie LSWR tenders along with smoke deflectors. Now number 2333 ‘Remembrance’ retained its name, plaque and status within the Southern Railway.

Inscribed on James Scott’s Victory Arch, at Waterloo station: “Dedicated to the employees of the Company who fell in the war.” and the names of those London and South Western employees who gave their life are honoured within the arch.

And just to end this post, as written by Paul Hunter – the poppy is more than a one time of a year symbol:, 

I am not a badge of honour, I am not a racist smear,
I am not a fashion statement, to be worn but once a year,
I am not glorification of conflict or of war.
I am not a paper ornament a token,
I am more.

I am a loving memory, Of a father or a son,
a permanent reminder of each and every one. 
I’m paper or enamel, I’m old or shining new,
I’m a way of saying thank you, To every one of you.

I am a simple poppy, a reminder to you all,
That courage faith and honour,
will stand where heroes of all kinds fall.

Bachmann announce ex LSWR / SR 56ft non corridor cross country sets as part the EFE Rail range

As part of their quarterly British Railway Announcements for Winter 2022 Bachmann have announced the ex London South Western Railway (LSWR) / Southern railway 56ft non corridor cross country sets in 00 gauge.

EFE E86013 3 coach set 253 in SR Malachite (Picture Courtesy and copyright KMRC)

There were 36 sets formed wholly of 56ft vehicles and these sets were generically called ‘Cross County sets’. They were constructed between 1906 and 1910 being built originally as 4 coach sets. These sets comprised of the following:

  • Brake Thirds, four compartment to LSWR Drawing 1446, SR diagram 124, 2 per set
  • Composite (1st / 3rd class), seven compartment, to LSWR Drawing 1298, SR Diagram 274
  • Third LSWR Drawing 1302, SR Diagram 17, 8 compartment, (The all Thirds were originally introduced as 2nd / 3rd Composites but rebranded to all Thirds with no structural change by the end of 1919)

The set numbers were in the ranges 130-151, 253-263 and 311-314 (sets 311-314 were originally introduced as 6 coach sets but became four coach formations in 1934 (and subsequently 3 coach sets). All sets were reduced to three coaches in the mid to late 1930s by the removal of the 8 compartment Third Diagram 17 coaches which became loose stock. At the same time the number of first class compartments in the Composite, Diagram 274 was reduced from 5 to 3 (not a physical alteration just reclassification and change in class banding on the outside of the compartments)

EFE E86013 3 coach set 130 in BR Crimson (Picture Courtesy and copyright KMRC)

Despite the longevity of these sets, apart from the reduction from 4 to 3 coaches and the reclassification of some of the composite compartments there was no real physical changes to any of the coaches.
In terms of use, they were seen all over the SW section of the Southern and their duties were pretty well interchangeable with any other 3/4 set. They did not generally run on Brighton or SE section lines, although photographic evidence exists of them running along the south coast to Brighton.

Withdrawal of these sets was completed during 1956/7 Brake Third number LSWR 1520 SR 2975 (ex set 63 / 146) survives and is operational service on the Bluebell Railway http://www.bluebell-railway.co.uk/bluebell/pics/1520.html and Composite number 5065 (ex set 134) survives on the Kent and East Sussex Railway awaiting restoration.

As was standard LSWR practice not all the coaches had full electrical equipment, i.e dynamo and battery boxes the others being through wired.

EFE E86015 coach set 314 in BR Green showing box set (Picture Courtesy and copyright KMRC)

The initial EFE Rail Releases, build on the success of the EFE Rail Gate stock (and utilising some shared tooling), in three coach book box sets are as follows

  • E86013 ex LSWR Cross Country Set – 3 coach set 253 – SR Malachite SR Malachite
  • E86014 Ex LSWR/SR Cross Country Set – 3 Coach set 130 – BR Crimson BR Unlined Crimson
  • E86015 Ex LSWR/SR Cross Country Set – 3 Coach set 314 – BR Green BR(s) Green

These coach sets are currently on the high seas and should be with retailers such as Kernow Model Rail Centre  in the next few weeks.

Accurascale go bananas… and announce SR Diagram 1478 and 1479 banana vans in 00

Accurascale have today announced that they are to produce the SR built banana vans to diagrams 1478 and 1479.

The Engineering prototypes of the Accurascale SR Banana vans

The banana traffic through Southampton docks in the early 1930s had grown rapidly and whilst the SR had the 99 LSWR built banana vans these were not enough and resulted in the SR hiring suitable vans from the North Eastern Railway that also included some ex Great Central and Great Eastern Vehicles (see my post about the GER versions here).

Between August 1935 and February 1936 the therefore SR introduced 200 banana vans to Diagram 1478, numbered 50575-774. These were similar to the previous insulated vans (Diagram 1477), with the Southern ‘Power Brake’ arrangement with eight brake blocks, but had horizontal planking and fitted with steam heating to aid the ripening of the bananas.

D1478 (early version)

In December 1937, after the LNER had requested the return of all its vans that were on hire, a further 125 banana vans were ordered, To enable them to enter service quicker ordinary covered vans in construction were instead built as banana vans to Diagram 1479, numbered 50775-899. These had the same bodyside strapping and roof profile as the ordinary vans to give them a different visual look than the earlier D1478 vans.

The original SR livery of these vans was like the insulated vans of SR Stone body colour with red lettering

The Diagram 1479 (early version)

A slight difference in that the D1478 vehicles carried large SR lettering until 1936, before the SR switched to small lettered branding, which is how the D1479 vehicles entered traffic.
During the war some gained a red oxide livery, and in BR days were bauxite with a yellow spot indicating the van had additional insulation fitted. Most vans were taken out of traffic by 1958, those vans that remained in service found use in BR Departmental service, mainly being used as Fitted Heads and classified as Tadpole. Additional plating was also added to the top of the ends in later life.

The underside of the chassis

Accurascale have announced that their D1478 and D1479 models will feature details variations for both early and later (additional end plating etc.) versions of each van , a die cast chassis, brass bearings, three types of wheel (split spoke solid spoke and 3 hole disc), separate hand rails, grab handles, door handles, lamp brackets, vacuum and steam pipes, through pipes steam heating cock and full SR ‘Power brake’ gear along with turned metal sprung buffers.

These wagons will come in triple packs in a variety of liveries across their careers in banana traffic and are priced at £84.95 each, These wagons will also be available across Accurascale’s network of local stockists such as Kernow Model Rail Centre.

Livery artwork

ACC2045 D1478 Original SR Livery Pre-1936 triple pack-1
ACC2046 D1478 Original SR Livery Pre-1936 triple pack-2
ACC2047 D1478 SR Livery 1936 to March 1941 triple-pack
ACC2048 D1478 British Railways 1948-1961 triple-pack
ACC2049 D1478 British Railways 1961 onwards triple-pack
ACC2050 D1479 SR Livery 1936 to March 1941 triple-pack-1
ACC2051 D1479 SR Livery 1936 to March 1941 triple-pack-2
ACC2052 Mixed D1478/D1479 Transitional British Railways 1948-1950 triple pack
ACC2053 D1479 British Railways 1948-1961triple-pack
ACC2054 D1479British Railways 1961 onwards triple-pack
ACC2055 Tadpole mixed ex D1478-D1479 British Railways departmental triple-pack
ACC2056 Tadpole ex D1479 British Railways departmental triple-pack

A group shot showing the end differences.

Delivery is slated for Q4 2023, with decorated samples due in Spring of 2023.

These are often asked for prototypes, a good choice by Accurascale especially as they often ran in multiples at the head of Southampton goods trains, and will certainly be welcome on any SR/BRs South Western based model railway.

Some along with my older kit built versions will definitely be making an appearance on Canute Road Quay.

LSWR Diagram 1410 Covered van in 0 Gauge announced by Kernow Model Rail Centre

Kernow Model Rail Centre have announced the LSWR Diagram 1410 Covered Van in 0 Gauge as an exclusive model with the tooling owned by Kernow Model Rail Centre

The numerous LSWR 10 ton covered vans were built between 1885 and 1922 to a few different diagrams as the design was developed. Different body styles were combined with either timber or steal chassis with two axlebox types; Panter or Warner’s, and several different brake systems.

The low roof, sliding door Diagram 1410 covered vans were the most common LSWR covered van with well over 1000 built. Although many were scrapped or entered departmental use before Grouping many passed into SR ownership at grouping with a number, many in departmental use, surviving beyond nationalisation.

Brake gear varied from: single sided double block, ‘Morton Clutch’, the rarer for this diagram ‘Lifting Link’ and most commonly what the SR called ‘Freighter’ that had independent brake gear on each side.

Ten covered vans to the Diagram 1410 were built for the Somerset & Dorset Joint Railway (S&DJR) they differed from the LSWR versions as they did not have the end vents and only single sided brakes. They later were absorbed into SR stock and had end vents fitted, become identical to D1410 vans.

The tooling suite for the models allows for bodies with either 8 1.2” or 6 1.2” end planking with and without the end vents on steel chassis, 8 open spoke or 10 closed spoke wheels, and single sided, Morton, freighter or lifting link brake styles. The specification of the model includes highly detailed body and chassis, prototypical brake gear and safety loops fitted, beam compensation, sprung buffers and a sprung coupling hook fitted with metal three link couplings.

The models have been produced and are currently being shipped, the initial price is £66.95 each, that is the special early-bird price and only applies payment is made in full at the time of ordering. For those not wishing to pay in full, it will not be possible to place an order until after the models have arrived. These subsequent orders will be at the prevailing price of £77.95 and not the early-bird offer price.

Initially six livery versions are available, with two running numbers per livery:

A great announcement for LSWR/SR/BR(s) 0 Gauge modellers and perhaps further versions and Diagrams will follow should these be a success.

 

Bachmann Showcase Product Announcements – Autumn 2022 include SECR Diagram 1559 Dancehall Brake Van

Bachmann Europe have continued their new policy of making quarterly product announcements the highlight of todays announcement of new tooling is the SECR/SR Maunsell/Lyons Diagram 1559 25 ton good brake van first introduced in 1918.

These ‘modern’ 24ft long 16ft wheel base brake vans with their spacious guard’s accommodation were given the nickname ‘Dancehalls’ . Although the later SR standard brake vans had shorter bodies they used the same underframe design. A total of 60 of the vans were built between 1918 and 1927 with the first 20 being on 12″ channel underframes to Diagram 1559 and the following 40 on 15″ channel underframes to Diagram 1560. The difference between the two diagrams can be easily spotted as the Diagram 1560 vans did not have the bottom 3″ plank across the sides. Ten of the vans were rebuilt in 1963 for departmental use, these had one balcony incorporated into the van section and end windows added becoming diagram 1571, some of these after being both vacuum and air piped lasted until the 1980s.

The SR livery D1559 brake van

The four Bachmann models of the SECR Diagram 1559 brake vans being released are as follows:

  • 38-915 D1559 SECR Grey livery No. 11902 (also the number of the  preserved prototype at the Whitwell & Reepham Station in Norfolk)
  • 38-916 D1559 SR Pre-1936 Livery No.55462 (although many would have survived in this livery style well after 1936 and throughout the war)
  • 38-917 D1559 BR Grey livery No. S55457 as based at Hither Green
  • 38-918 D1559 BR Departmental Olive Green No. DS 55455 as based at Eastleigh Permanent Way Dept.

These models are complete with interior detail such as stove, brake handwheel and desk visible through the end windows.

It is good to see these excellent looking (and often requested) models now coming to the market as I know, having provided some assistance, that these have been development for a couple of years.

The full details of the Bachmann Showcase announcement can be found on the Kernow Model rail Centre website here.

 

Seventy Years of the South Western, A Railway Journey Through Time – a Review @transportps

Published by friends at Pen and Sword Transport “Seventy Years of the South Western – A Railway Journey Through Time” is Colin Boocock’s romp through the South Western railways on which he grew up and later worked on.  With yesterday,  July 9th,  marking 55 years since the end of the steam on the Southern Region a review of this recently published book seems apt.

This comprehensive 240 glossy page book covers through its 24 chapters: the Southern main lines to the west of England and the ‘Withered arm’, the Direct Line to Portsmouth, Waterloo, Clapham Junction, the suburban network and the Isle of Wight.  Five chapters provide more details on the ‘Railway hubs’ of Southampton, Eastleigh, Bournemouth, Salisbury and Exeter.  Other chapters look at the railways through the Counties of Somerset, Dorset, Devon and Hampshire, and finally the book takes a look at the Hampshire Diesels, electrification, news trains, Franchisees and onwards to the future.

Colin started his career at Eastleigh in the 1950s before returning in a management role in the 1960s. Being part of the senior management at the time of privatisation Colin is able to write with authority on the processes and outcomes at that time. Many of the photographs used to accompany the researched text throughout the book are Colin’s own and therefore are refreshingly new, although post 1950s, and demonstrate how much he travelled across the South Western with a knack for capturing what then would have been mundane but now provides interesting reference.

Owing to its broad South Western topic the book is not, unsurprisingly, as detailed as some of the more line specific publications, it does however provide a good overview and introduction of the whole of the South Western network throughout the ages, with a balance of historical information, diagrams and photographs that will be of interest to railway historians and modellers alike; especially those looking for a broad starting point for gaining an understanding into the history and intricacies of the South Western network.

KMRC announce Exclusive 0 Gauge 1902 RCH seven plank open wagon in the livery of Guildford brick and tile manufacturer T.Mitchell

The Kernow Model Rail Centre have announced an Exclusive 0 Gauge 1902 RCH seven plank open wagon in the livery of Guildford brick and tile manufacturer “T. Mitchell”.

The T.Mitchell RCH 7 Plank PO wagon. Picture courtesy and copywrite KMRC

Thomas Mitchell was originally the proprietor of a brick and gravel merchant, that by the early 1900s had become Thomas Mitchell and Sons, brick and tile manufacturers, with a large brick works at Guildford Park. By 1902 they had their own black with white lettered 10ton Private Owner wagon for the transportation of coal to the works.

The Kernow Model Rail Centre Exclusive highly detailed model in 0 Gauge is being produced for KMRC by Dapol Ltd.  The model is based on their RCH 1887 specification seven Plank open wagon and features a 9ft die-cast chassis with a compensation beam and fitted with open spoke wheels, the body is injection moulded with separately applied parts, sprung metal buffers and sprung coupling hooks with three link couplings.

The Exclusive model K7072 Dapol 7 Plank Open Wagon number 1902 – T Mitchell Brick and Tile Manufacturer Guildford, is priced at £56.95 and is available now online, click here to order, and from both Kernow Model Rail Centre branches.

New LSWR 3D printed station seats and hand barrows available from Mudmagnet models

A new range of LSWR 3D printed station seats and hand barrows in 4mm scale are now available from my friend and excellent modeller Richard Slate via his Mudmagnet Models.

You may have seen some of Richard’s lovely layouts, on the exhibition circuit before, with their high level of attention to detail such as “Orchard Road” and “Oakley Green Oil Depot and Locomotive Depot”. 

Richard has recently added to his growing range of 4mm  and 7mm  3D resin printed items, that already feature some wonderful workshop related equipment, a number of lovely LSWR/SR related items:

  • LSWR Station Seat
  • LSWR Parcels Barrow
  • LSWR Luggage Barrow
  • LSWR Goods Hand Barrow
  • LSWR Long Bow Barrow

As can be seen from the pictures for such small items, especially when compared with the one penny coin, the level of detail is exquisite, even the wheels on the barrows rotate! All are supplied unpainted and ready to paint, with acrylics being recommended.

They are quite inexpensive and will help bring any LSWR /SR/BR(s) station or goods yard scene to life. They can be ordered from the Mudmagnet Models online shop here.

 

 

Dapol announce new production batches of their 00 gauge ex LSWR B4 0-4-0 tanks and Class73 Electro-diesels

At this weekend’s London Festival of Railway Modelling, Dapol announced new production batches of their ex LSWR Adams B4 0-4-0 tanks and Class 73 Electro-Diesels both in 00 gauge.

Adams B4

‘Guernsey’ from the second batch shunts on Canute Road Quay , the newly announced sister ‘Jersey’ is likely to be in this condition
‘Caen’ and my already renamed ‘Trouville’ show off their Southampton Docks brown livery on Canute Road Quay

The Dapol ex LSWR B4 class 0-4-0t were first announced back in March 2014 and the first versions arrived in June 2018., with a second batch with further livery and detail variants including the first appearance of the Drummond Boiler fitted and one of the 5 off Drummond K14 versions, arriving during 2020.
This third batch includes seven new versions, to the same technical specification as the previous batches, (exact livery versions or artwork have not yet been released) as follows:

  • 4S-018-005 B4 0-4-0T BR Late Crest 30096, as carried between c1959 and December 1963
  • 4S-018-012 B4 0-4-0T Lined Dark Green Jersey 91 [sic Dapol have the number incorrect as she was 81] , as she carried between November 1893 and circa 1920/1 when she gained a more enclosed cab.
  • 4S-018-013 B4 0-4-0T LSWR Dark Green 82, K14 type with Drummond Boiler, as her condition between April 1907 and February 1924 when she gained SR Goods lined black livery.
  • 4S-018-014 B4 0-4-0T Trouville Brown 89, as carried from approx 1923 to April 1935 if no rear cab number or April 1935 to February 1950 if the number is painted on the cab rear.
  • 4S-018-015 B4 0-4-0T Southern Black lined 99, as she carried between January 1926 and January 1936.
  • 4S-018-016 B4 0-4-0T Black ‘Corrall Queen’ nameplate and 30096 smokebox door number plate as she ran between December 1963 and December 1972 when she was owned by P.D.Fuels Ltd of Dibles Wharf.
  • 4S-018-017 B4 0-4-0T Dorset Green 99, after sale in February 1949 to Stewarts & Lloyds Ltd (Bilson Staffordshire) and being scrapped by August 1958.

The livery artwork is under preparation and the finished models are not expected to be available until Q3 2023.

Class 73

E6012 JB type
73002 a JA type, note the slightly different side windows
73136 in Intercity Executive livery

Also announced are a new batch of seven Class 73 Electro-Diesel liveries, and sees the return of BR Blue livery models that have not featured in the line up since the model run was released in November 2015.
The first six of the eventual class of 49 were built by BR at their Eastleigh works in 1962 and were designated Type JA. The remaining locomotives, with a higher power output and top speed increased from 80 to 90mph. were built by English Electric at Vulcan Foundry at Newton Le Willows between 1965 and 1967 and were designated type JB.

Twelve locomotives survive into preservation, including E6003 now named ‘Sir Herbert Walker’ on the Swindon & Cricklade Railway (of which I am part of the owning group) and several are still in use with South Western Railway, Southern, GBRF and Network Rail.

The seven versions announced are as follows:

  • 4D-006-015 Class 73 JB Electric Blue E6012 Small Yellow Panel
  • 4D-006-016 Class 73 JB Early Blue SYP & Double Arrow Logo E6031
  • 4D-006-018 Class 73 JB BR Blue FYP 73120
  • 4D-006-017 Class 73 JA BR Blue FYP 73002
  • 4D-006-020 Class 73 JB Intercity Executive 73136
  • 4D-006-019 Class 73 JB Large Logo BR Blue 73126
  • 4D-006-021 Class 73 JB GB Railfreight Battle of Britain 73109

Dapol advise that the decorated samples, with the same technical specification as previous batches, are under review and feedback is being provided to the factory to correct a small number of minor issues. The models are expected to be available towards the end of the year.