Posts Tagged ‘Canute Road Quay’

This months picture… (better late than never) …

London, Chatham and Dover Railway Kirtey T Class 0-6-0T shunts at Canute Road Quay. The T Class is a Q Kits white metal kit

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It is certainly going to be a different Christmas for many this year, it is not cancelled but just needs to be celebrated in a different way, especially if like me you have gone from Tier 2 through to Tier 4 in less than 48 hours!

It’s a cold, crisp and frosty December morning as we approach Christmas at Canute Road Quay and the crew on board ex LSWR Adams B4 Class No. 100 try to keep warm whilst shunting on the quay as flurries of snow start to get heavier.

As the festive season and New Year break is upon us, please make the time to contact your friends and family, especially those whom might be alone, and not able to be in the company of others at this most unusual of times. It is good and OK to simply ask “Are you OK?” and likewise it is “OK not to be OK” and reach out for assistance. The one good thing, if anything, this year has been the kindness and generosity of others to help and support each other, and long may this continue.

I just wanted to say very many thanks to all of you whom have taken the time to read this blog over the past 12 months. I hope you have found such ramblings interesting and informative.
I have always enjoyed corresponding with many of you that have made contact me via email or the comments field on my various posts. I look forward to corresponding with you again in the New Year.

A further flurry of activity will be taking place at the start of the new year with Hornby (January 5th) announcing its 2021 range followed a few weeks later by Bachmann making the next of their now quarterly range announcements.  I will bring you all the Southern Railway / Southern Region related news on here as soon as their announcements are made.

Seasons greetings, whatever your faith or beliefs, Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you all! Fill up your life with as much love, compassion, tolerance, peace, happiness as you can and hopefully some time for modelling!

Finally, remember a dog is for life… not just Christmas…

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This months picture…

A Hornby W4 0-4-0t Peckett modified with an open cab as well as dumb buffers on Canute Road Quay

 

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This is the sixth in a series of ‘Making Quay Changes’ posts with the Canute Road Quay being transported to either a different location or era or both.  It follows my Making Quay Changes #1 post moving the scene Eastwards, and then back to Southampton with my Making Quay Changes #2 post but in the 1950s ,  #3 post set in the 1920/30s, #4 Being Industrious and #5 the 07 diesels take over. We now move to the South East with ex SECR motive power being utilised.

The P Class No.1558 from Hattons shunts at the quay

The T Class No. 1604 0-6-0T simmers in the background

The P class and T class meet on the Quay and shows the diminutive size of the P class

The LCDR T Class arrives as the quay.

The SER 0-40CT No. 1302 waits its next duty

The P class No. 1558 is about to depart

A busy moment at the quay

Although my usual modelling genre, as regular readers will know, is the Southern Railway between 1946 and 1949, however due to Canute Road Quay has very few visual references to either period or location (yes there are a couple, but hey…) It therefore allows me to change the location and era with different rolling stock, vehicles and details.

For this post we have stayed at Canute Road Quay‘s usual time frame but moved its location slightly. Having deliberately when building Canute Road Quay left the vehicles and other details such as crates, sack stacks and oil drums etc. loose, it enables them to be both be moved around, to give some variety in photographs, and or replaced with other items to different periods.

In this case Canute Road Quay‘s has been transported further to the South East, perhaps through squinted eyes it could on the Medway at Rochester, or or the Channel coast at Richborough Port or Newhaven Harbour perhaps…

The steam locomotives include the Hattons ex SECR P class 0-6-0T, an ex London, Chatham and Dover Railway Kirtey T Class 0-6-0T and even my South Eastern Railway 0-4-0CT crane tank makes an appearance.

The T class 0-6-0T were a class of ten locomotives introduced by the LC&DR (prior to the formation of the South, Eastern and Chatham Railway in 1899) between 1879 and 1893 specifically for shunting duties, with appropriately one of the class being initially used at Dover Docks. Although withdraws started in 1932 two of the class  1602 and 1604 (as my model) lasted until July 1951 and November 1950 respectively. My model is white metal and built from a Q Kit.

The SER 0-4-0CT crane tank number 1302 as per my model, was one of two built for the SER by Neilson in 1881. Like the T class she had worked at Dover Docks and also Richborough although she saw out most of her life at Lancing and Stewarts Lane. She was withdrawn in July 1949 and scrapped at Ashford. My model is built from a South Eastern Finecast white metal kit.

I hope you enjoy this post, the next ‘Making Quay Changes’ post with Canute Road Quay may or may not be set in its usual location, so once again, where and what era will it be…?

 

 

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This months picture…

Adams B4 0-4-0t No.100 rest at Canute Road Quay, she is built from a white metal kit

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This is the fifth in the series of ‘Making Quay Changes’ posts with the Canute Road Quay being transported to either a different location or era or both.  In this post we are firmly in the Southampton Docks but after 1962 when the Class 07 diesels were specifically introduced to modernise the operations in the docks.

A pair of Heljan Class 07 models meet at Canute Road Quay

Class 07 D2985 arrives at the quay

D2988 is from the second Heljan production batch

Passing Class 07s at Canute Road quay

A busy moment in time at Canute Road Quay

D2985 arrives on the quay and passes D2988 awaiting to depart

D2985 arrives at the quay

Although my usual modelling genre, as regular readers will know, is the

Southern Railway between 1946 and 1949, however due to Canute Road Quay has very few visual references to either period or location (yes there are a couple, but hey…) items such as the vehicles and other details such as crates, sack stacks and oil drums etc. are loose, so it enables them to be both be moved around, to give some variety in photographs, and or replaced with other items to different periods.

The USA 0-6-0 tanks had been in service within Southampton Docks since 1946, Due to the various tight curves within Southampton Docks utilising existing Diesel shunters such as the EE 350HP, later 09 class was not going to be an option. Therefore in 1962 Fourteen 0-6-0 diesel-electric shunting 275HP locomotives specifically for use in Southampton Docks were purchased by British Railways from Ruston Paxman.  They had a wheelbase of only 8 ft 7½ in, compared with 11 ft 6 in for an 08. With their high well glazed cab offset between long and short bonnets they certainly had their own distinctive character.

The Heljan models, as per my review here, have captured the look of the prototype well. The feature a multi part injection  moulded body with fine etched front and rear nose grills on a heavy diecast chassis. Separately fitted items include: metal handrails, sprung buffers, windscreen wipers, pipework, roof mounted air horns and factory fitted screw link couplings. Underneath the body the chassis features the correct air cylinders, sand boxes, sand pipes, other pipework and brake gear. Also fitted is a working lubricator linkage on the left hand side (when viewed long bonnet forward. Included with the model are discs, including those with duty numbers, as used within Southampton Docks.

When paired with the suitable later era rolling stock, that I have now collected and weathered, the Heljan Class 07s certainly look the part and with their smooth running make shunting at Canute Road Quay easy and a refreshing change from my usual period.

I hope you enjoy this post, the next ‘Making Quay Changes’ post with Canute Road Quay may or may not be set in its usual location, so once again, where and what era will it be…?

 

 

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This months picture…

USA Tank No.68 shunts in the sunshine at Canute Road Quay.

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This is the fourth in a series of ‘Making Quay Changes’ posts with the Canute Road Quay being transported to either a different location or era or both.  It follows my Making Quay Changes #1 post moving the scene Eastwards, and then back to Southampton with my Making Quay Changes #2 post but in the 1950s  and #3 post set in the 1920/30s. We now move somewhere / anywhere in the late 1950s / 60s with industrial locomotives providing the horse power.

Passing Peckets a modified Hornby W4 0-4-0t passes a B2 0-6-0t renamed as ‘O.S.V.Bullied’

A Hornby B2 0-6-0t ‘Leader’ shunts at the quay

a modified Hattons Andrew Barclay 14″ 0-6-0t simmers

Peckett B4 0-6-0t ‘O.V.S. Bullied’ crosses towards the quayside

A pair of Hornby Sentinels pass each other with ‘Cattewater’ passing ‘Graham’

‘Cattewater’ stays on brand shunting an oil tank wagon

the outside cranked ‘Graham’ is on loan from the Oxfordshire Ironstone Co.

ex Class 05 now No.2 pauses at the crossing

Although my usual modelling genre, as regular readers will know, is the Southern Railway between 1946 and 1949, however due to Canute Road Quay has very few visual references to either period or location (yes there are a couple, but hey…) Having deliberately when building Canute Road Quay left the vehicles and other details such as crates, sack stacks and oil drums etc. loose, it enables them to be both be moved around, to give some variety in photographs, and or replaced with other items to different periods.

In this case Canute Road Quay‘s is off the British Railways network and could be any private quayside / wharf. In and around Southampton alone there were a myriad of rail served private docks and wharves including inner and outer docks and those along the River Itchen such as Dibles Wharf, Notham, Britannia and Victoria wharf,  many of which had their own locomotives.

In this case we see a number of locomotives privately operated ranging from steam locomotives to diesel shunters sharing duties around the quay.

The steam locomotives include the the Hornby W4 0-4-0t and B2 0-6-0t Pecketts, and the Hatton’s Andrew Barclay 14″ 0-6-0t both of which I have modified for use on Canute Road Quay. As per my Workbench Witterings #3 post they have been fitted with the use of dumb, usually basic wooden blocks, buffers so often seen at such locations. They remained in surface well into the 1960s and in some cases beyond. My B2 Pecketts have had their identities changed to be ‘O.V.S. Bullied’ and ‘Leader’ (spot the theme…), nameplates obtained from my friends at 247 Developments,  and weathered.

The early 1960s saw the introduction of a number of diesel shunters such as the 34 ton chain drive 4 wheel Rolls-Royce diesel powered Sentinel shunter rated at 233hp and the later 325hp, 38 ton style with outside cranks.
The Hornby Esso  4wDM version was introduced in 1963 and was for use in the Esso Bitumen works at Cattewater, hence its name, in Plymouth
‘Graham’ (Hornby must have been tempting me to purchase this one on purpose!) was delivered new to the Oxfordshire Ironstone company as Locomotive No.10207 in May 1965 and was fitted with vacuum braking and a higher ratio gearbox for mainline working, so is obviously on loan to the quayside.
The Hornby models have been modified slightly with the lifting eyes at each end having their holes drilled out, the wasp stripes on ‘Cattewater’ continued on the side of the bufferbeam as per the prototype and also weathered.

Moving towards the late 1960s saw some of the myriad of early BR shunter types being withdrawn and some entering industrial service such as the ex Class 05. This Heljan example is modelled on the second batch built by Hunslet Engine Company of Leeds and built in 1961 numbered D2574 to D2618, had a  higher roof line, smaller wheels (3’4″ instead of 3’9″) deeper buffers with oval heads than the first batch built in 1955. D2578 was sold to HP Bulmers in 1968 and is now preserved, but seen here working at the quay.

I hope you enjoy this post, the next ‘Making Quay Changes’ post with Canute Road Quay  the next such post will be be set in its usual location, but what era will it be…?

 

 

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As I advised in my recent Covid, exhibitions, mental health and life changes post, in an attempt to restore my modelling mojo whilst on furlough I started to build a number of the wagon kits that I had added to the to do later pile over the last few years.

The Diagram 1410 Covered Goods Wagons awaiting painting

The crispness of the Cambrian Models mouldings can be clearly seen in with this Diagram 1316 open

The finished painted and lettered wagons in pre and post 1936 liveries.

The Diagram 1426 shows of its height against a low roofed Diagram 1410

The kits were all from the excellent Cambrian Models range and comprised of:

  • 4 off ex LSWR 10t Covered Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1410
  • 2 off ex SECR 10t Covered Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1426
  • 1 off ex LSWR 8 plank 12t Open Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1316

These kits are of an excellent standard, with crisp mouldings and assemble quite easily once you have got your head around some of the various options, mainly around the type and number of brakes fitted. As usual I refer to the bibles for Southern wagon builders the “Illustrated History of Southern Wagons” the four volumes are now sadly out of print but are worth tracking down if you don’t already have access to copies.

Although I follow the well written and detailed instructions; I tend to replace the plastic buffer heads with metal replacements from the Alan Gibson range or similar to give additional durability. I also add some cut lead sheet to the underside of the chassis to bring the weight up to approximately 30 grams (around one ounce for older readers) as this improves running. I always fit brass top hat pin point bearings into the axle boxes and use Alan Gibson wheels.
I tend to purchase these kits, wheels etc. either at shows, when we could, or online from H&A Models whom always provide a friendly and efficient service and in these times it’s always good to help and continue to support such excellent traders.

The Hornby Diagram 1543 ‘New’ van showing the incorrect brown and oversize Tare lettering height

The paint dries in the oven

B4 No. 82 runs around the two repainted Hornby Diagram 1543 brake vans.

A very busy scene at Canute Road Quay as all the wagon builds have come to visit

In addition to the above wagons, whilst on a roll, I have finally got round to repainting the two Hornby ex LSWR 20t Warner ‘New’ diagram 1543 brake vans that arrived at the start of year. Whist excellent models the SR versions in this first batch were not finished in the correct shade of SR Brown, also the Tare lettering was incorrectly the same size as the wagon number when it should be smaller. A nice touch by Hornby  is that they provide a separate beautifully printed plate for the “Not to work between Tonbridge and West St. Leonards via Battle” in addition to it being pre printed on the wagon side, so I have affixed these to the repaints.

For all my wagons I tend to follow the same painting process:

  • Firstly for the kit builds I give a dusting of Halford plastic primer from an aerosol ‘rattle’ can
  • I then brush paint the base colour, I prefer to paint two thin coats rather than one heavy coat.
  • I always help dry the paintwork in a warmed oven (set to less than 50 deg and the door kept open, luckily, I don’t need to ask anyone permission first!).
  • In most cases I use lettering from the HMRS Pressfix transfer range and I use a mix of pre (large SR) and post 1936 (small SR) styles to give some variety.
  • Finally, I apply Railmatch Satin Varnish from a rattle can to fix the lettering and even the finish.

Well I said finally, but actually the wagons now await degrees of weathering that I tend to do as a batch and still have to do so for those shown here.

 

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This is the third in a series of ‘Making Quay Changes’ posts with the Canute Road Quay being transported to either a different location or era or both.  It follows my Making Quay Changes #1 post moving the scene Eastwards, and then back to Southampton with my Making Quay Changes #2 post but in the 1950s. In this post we remain in the Southampton Docks but in the 1920s heading into the 1930s.

Canute Road Quay in mid 1920s ‘Guernsey’ passes ‘Caen’ showing the two Southampton Docks liveries

‘Caen’ passes ‘Trueville’ both heading into the 1930s

Shunting continues on Canute Road Quay

No.88 in early SR livery visits the Docks shed as ‘Guernsey’ shunts

Although my usual modelling genre, as regular readers will know, is the Southern Railway between 1946 and 1949, however due to Canute Road Quay has very few visual references to either period or location (yes there are a couple, but hey…) It therefore allows me to change the location and era with different rolling stock, vehicles and details.

In this case we have stayed at Canute Road Quay‘s intended setting but time travelled to a time between the wars moving from the roaring 1920s to the uncertain 1930s with the prospect of peace being unsettled and ruining the phrase “the war to end all wars”

Having deliberately when building Canute Road Quay left the vehicles and other details such as crates, sack stacks and oil drums etc. loose, it enables them to be both be moved around, to give some variety in photographs, and or replaced with other items to different periods.

In this case we still see the lovely range of Dapol B4 class 0-4-0 tanks bringing a splash of colour to the scene with the early Southampton Docks lined green livery being replaced during the 1920s with the possibly more familiar lined brown livery that was maintained until the B4 tanks were replaced at the Docks by the USA tanks after the second world war. We also see in this period colourful private owner wagons (before they were nationally pooled and unkempt during WW2).

I hope you enjoy this post, the next ‘Making Quay Changes’ post with Canute Road Quay may or may not be set in its usual location, so where and what era will it be…?

 

 

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