Archive for the ‘Workbench Witterings’ Category

In my Westhill Road Ramblings#1 post here, I discussed my thought process for selecting the style and type of signal box for my new little modelling venture Westhill Road. This post looks at my scratch build of the chosen ground level signal box based upon the LSWR Type 3B design.

A cruelly enlarged picture of my scratch built Type 3B ground signal box. The roof is not affixed yet whilst it awaits some final details and a signaller to be added.

The basic assembly takes shape.

The mitred corners and triangular corner uprights can be seen.

Further framework and wall tops added.

The brick base is added and the side porch is started.

The porch is added, still a separate assembly to aid later painting.

The hipped roof, stovepipe chimney and Ratio guttering.

The underside of the roof with roof trusses added and painted.

The Ratio interior is fitted and further further painting completed.

The working lamp is fixed to the roof beam, and a view of the knee frame.

A quick snap showing the effect of the illumination, (a scratch made light shade hides the tiny surface mount LED)

As with many of my scratch-built buildings, even if they are not to be exact replicas of an original prototype, I like to use as much research as possible to ensure that the characteristics and proportions of such a building look correct. In this instance I wanted to make use of some nice proprietarily laser cut windows from Proses Hobby Shop, therefore using these fixed dimensions, and of course standard door sizes, I started by quickly drawing out the design, to scale, referring back to reference photographs at every stage.
The use of these laser cut windows and their dimensions are therefore a slight compromise but by adjusting the dimensions of the rest of the building to suit it maintains the proportions and the overall effect that I am wanting to achieve.

The construction of these LSWR signal boxes was basically a wooden frame and wooden clapperboard structure and I’ve replicated this using Wills 213 clapperboard for the main structure.
From my drawing I cut the wooden floor, from Wills 201 wood planking, to size to give a square base for the clapperboard walls to be built around it.

I mitred the edges of the walls before filing back the outside of the cemented corners at 45° and adding 2mm x 2mm triangular plastic strut upright, see picture left. The use of the triangular section on the building corners creates the corner framing and also completely hides any joint.
Additional plastic microstrip is then used to create the other wooden framework, both externally and internally, and to create the windowsills etc.  (remember to include the thickness of windowsills, door frames etc when cutting out the apertures). Plastic microstrip and Plastrut square section was used to built up the framing across the tops of the walls, along with roof trusses.
The side porch is made from a mix of plasticard, planked plasticard and another Proses Hobby Shop laser cut window. It was made as a separate assemble to make paining easier.

The ground frame sites on a low brick-built foundation, that includes the opening for the point rodding and signals wires to exit with a small piece of microstrip added to represent the steel beam supporting the bricks above the opening.

As ground level signal boxes do not have an interlocking room under the floor, they used a ‘Knee Frame’ with short levers that was higher off the floor to allow interlocking directly beneath the levers. I have used a modified Ratio 224 signal box interior kit for the interior details. I mounted the lever frame base on a piece of plastic I beam and shortened every lever, to represent the 10 lever frame in accordance with the signal box diagram I have already created.

The hipped roof was made using Wills 203 Slates with thin card ridge tiles added. Guttering is added around the bottom edge using Ratio 300 gutters and downpipes. The stove pipe chimney has been fashioned from plastic rod and turned at the top to represent a cowl, and lead flashing asses from very thin plasticard.

The internal working lamp and its shade have been made using a suitable shaped plastic part, I think an old wagon kit, found in the scrap box, with a Layouts4u.net 0805 12v Nano SMD led (prewired) glued to it. It’s affixed to the ceiling truss and the fine wires passing down the wall behind the stove and its chimney.

The external paint colours are SR Buildings Cream and SR Middle Chrome Green from Precision Paints.
I will wait until Westhill Road is ready for its signal box to be planted before I weather it to tone the colours down to suit the tone of the rest of the layout.

Shopping list

  • Wills Building sheets – 201 Wood planking (floor), 203 Slates, 213 Clapboarding,
  • Proses Hobby Shop – 28x126mm 12 pane windows, 12/17mm 9 pane windows
  • Layouts4u.nett 0805 12v Nano SMD led (prewired)
  • Ratio – 553 signal box interior, 538 gutters and downpipes
  • Micorstrip / Plastrut – various
  • Precision Paints – SR Buildings Cream (P95) and SR Middle Chrome Green (P93)

Recommended reading: Signal Boxes of the London & South Western Railway: A study of Architectural Style by G.A.Pryer

I hope this post has shown that, whilst some similar kits might be available, scratch building is not a dark art and is enjoyable and rewarding.

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Welcome to the first of my Westhill Road Ramblings as I think thoughts (or why isn’t that thunk?), yes dangerous I know, to develop the concept in my mind / imagination and start to make actual physical progress on my new little scenic diorama type layout. To read my introduction to Westhill Road click here. As the layout progresses my imagination, vision , concepts and ideas board will be covered via such ramblings posts, whilst more details on some of the physical items will be covered in my Workbench Witterings series.

Now on to the main subject of this post the signal cabin. The original thought in my mind I had for Westhill Road, with its small level Crossing and minimum signalling and only one point (plus a co-acting trap point) for the siding, was to utilise one of the lovely Kernow Model Rail Centre LSWR ground frame cabins.

The three potential options for the cabin at Westhill Road

The signal box diagram for Westhill Road

However upon developing the concept for the layout further and looking at signal Box diagrams for similar locations on the Southern, and having created a signal box diagram for Westhill Road that required a 10 lever frame, I soon realised that such a ground frame and cabin would actually be too small.
I initially thought about using my scratch built model of Hawkhurst signal box that I built from scratch many years ago now, when still a teenager, but feel that using such signal box at this location would possibly also be out of character for a small wayside halt and crossing  location as Westhill Road and maybe affect the balance of buildings I intend to have on the layout, as it will located directly in front of the roadside combined station masters house / booking office.

A cruelly enlarged picture of my scratch built Type 3B ground signal box. The roof is not affixed yet whilst it awaits some final details and a signaller to be added.

I decided to take a look at the idea of using ground-based signal box. The LSWR have a number of different types of boxes, as the design involved throughout the years, small ground versions of the signal cabins were quite common across the network at smaller locations such as level crossing gates and small stations and these could either be directly mounted on the ground or onto a station platform. I therefore settled on the idea of an LSWR type 3B signal cabin as these were used at similar crossing gate locations.

A birds eye view inside the box

A view showing the knee frame

A quick snap showing the effect of the illumination, (a scratch made lamp shade hides a tiny surface mount LED)

These Type 3B boxes were introduced in 1889 and were generally located in and around Plymouth and also on the Ilfracombe line in North Devon, including wonderfully named locations such as Stoney Mill Gates, Vellator Gates and Duckpool Gates. Unlike the earlier Type 3 and 3A boxes they did not have toplights (replaced with weatherboard or any ornamental valances. As these ground level boxes did not have an interlocking room beneath the floor they utilised a raised ‘knee frame’ with shorter levers.

This slightly more plain style is, in my thinking, ideal for Westhill Road as it gives a slightly more general and not to area / company specific appearance. I have therefore knocked up a quick scratch built version of such a ground box, that is internally detailed, complete with a knee frame and each individual short lever, coloured to match the Westhill Road signal box plan,  and illuminated (as will all the buildings I build for Westhill Road). I will detail the build process in a near future Workbench Witterings post before you ask, and although I do not yet have the actual layout built to plonk it on, I already feel of the three options it will look the part.

 

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As I hinted in my Workbench Witterings #10 Forward dating @Hornby Bulleid Merchant Navy 21c7 to 1947 condition post here, I also intended to do the same with my  R3435 21C3 ‘Royal Mail’ model. 

21c3 Royal Mail in May 1947 condition with freshly fitted standard smoke deflectors

21c3 in bits following an attack of a razor saw

21c3 Royal Mail

21c3 and 21c7 together what I call the posh chocolate shot

Like the latest Hornby model of 21c7 the previously released model R3435 21C3 ‘Royal Mail’ model has been produced in her early condition, with the ‘widows peak’ and without smoke deflectors. 21c3 was introduced in September 1941 in malachite green livery but repainted in plain black as a wartime measure in May 1943. Changes to the smoke deflection stated in September 1944 when she was fitted with the top cowl and short flared deflectors. 21c3 was repainted malachite green in November 1945 and was subsequently fitted with standard length and style of smoke detectors in May 1947. She stayed in this condition until June 1948 when she was renumbered 35003 and British Railways in SR style sunshine lettering.

I have therefore took the razor to hand and modelled 21c3 in her May 1947 condition just after she received freshly painted new standard deflectors, complete with the baton along the top for mounting the Devon Belle wing plates as a per a photograph of her that I have in my collection.
Like my 21c7 conversion I have used etched smoke deflectors, electric lamps and a replacement smoke box dart from the excellent Albert Goodall range supplied by my friends at RT Models. The replacement lamp irons are simply staples cut to length and I have replaced the flat printed nameplates and smokebox door roundel with etched versions from Fox Transfers.

I have followed the same steps as per my Workbench Witterings #10 post here so will not repeat the stage by stage details. Who knows when we might see this version from Hornby, as I said in the #10 post once you get over the brave step of putting a razor saw to a brand new model the modification is reasonably quick and easy to complete.

 

 

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As per my review, here, of the Hornby Bulleid Merchant Navy R3717 21c7 Aberdeen Commonwealth in SR wartime black, the model has been produced in her early condition, with the ‘widows peak’ without smoke deflectors. 21c7 was one of the first batch of ten Merchant Navy pacifics, she was introduced in June 1942 in malachite green livery but was quickly repainted in plain black as a wartime measure. 21c7 remained in this condition until August 1944 when she gained the more familiar cowl above the smokebox and also received short flared smoke deflectors. She gained the to become standard length and style of smoke detectors whilst still in black in June 1947.

The forward dating complete, 21c7 in 1947 condition.

The model and new components ready to start the conversion.

The top brackets are soldered to the etched deflectors

The first cuts are the bravest… and the front fairing edges bevelled.

The new cowl is trial fitted in place.

The deflectors are curved to the correct shape prior to painting.

The new front face is complete

The finished 21c7, now awaits some weathering.

Another view of the finished 21c7

As my usual modelling period is between 1946 and 1949 I have forward dated 21c7 to the condition she was just before being outshopped in malachite green at the end of June 1947. This requires the fitting of the cowl above the smokebox, in place of the ‘widows peak’, the fitting of standard smoke deflectors, with electric lamps attached. The middle position lamp irons were also moved to the smokebox door once smoke deflectors were fitted.

For this relatively simple forward dating process I have used the following items: etched smoke deflectors, electric lamps and a replacement smoke box dart from the excellent Albert Goodall range supplied by my friends at RT Models. The replacement lamp irons are simply staples cut to length and I have replaced the flat printed nameplates and smokebox door roundel with etched versions from Fox Transfers.
The Hornby nameplates come off quite easily, they are held in place by three small lugs, one in the centre and one towards each end of the arms. I slide a sharp knife underneath from one side to the other to lift the plates. I then ensure any remaining lug was carefully cut flush to the side. I affix the etched plates using a very small amount of superglue applied with a cocktail stick (some people prefer to use a small amount of varnish instead of glue).

The first step was to fold up and solder the brackets just below the top inside edge of the etched brass deflectors. The deflectors were then bent to both their correct vertical shape and also the curve at the bottom edge to match the existing fairing. I then used the deflectors to mark the position of the horizontal cut required in the existing front fairing. An Albert Goodall electric lamp was glued on the inside front edge of each deflector lining up with bottom of the two rivets on the outside of the deflector. I then used Halfords spray cans to first prime using etched primer before top coats of satin black.

Next I took a deep breath and using a razor saw, cut horizontally,  along the previously marked lines, the fairing back to the smoke box face and then vertically downwards level with the smokebox front, this removes both the ‘widows peak and the sides to meet the horizontal cuts. I also removed the Hornby printed roundel and the smokebox door dart. The sides of the slot in front of the chimney was also filed to match the rest of the opening. With all cuts cleaned up with a fine file, I also bevelled the remaining front fairings to give them a thinner edge appearance.

The Albert Goodall cast white metal cowl was filed to suit the slot in front of the chimney and glued into place using superglue. I drilled holes in the smokebox door for the two lamp irons and the replacement door dart. The finish painted deflectors were glued into place with the top brackets affixed to the top edge of the flat top gutter strip.

The Hornby model as supplied has an all over slightly matt finish, in reality the flat top, cab room and middle section of the tender cab roof were matt, whilst the sides were more of a satin finish and the front cowl also tended to be satin. I repainted the top and the smokebox front and door matt black. Before applying the etched nameplates and roundel I masked the matt areas and sprayed the sides of the model with Halfords satin lacquer. Once the nameplates and roundel were fitted the final tasks were to fit the new Albert Goodall smokebox door dart and the Hornby supplied cylinder drain cocks.

Once you get over the brave step of putting a razor saw to a brand new model the modification is reasonably quick and easy to complete. I will at some stage do the same to my malachite green R3435 21C3 ‘Royal Mail’ model!

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The first five members of the London Brighton and South Coast Railway (LBSC) E2 class 0-6-0 tanks were introduced by L Billinton in June 1913.  In service they were found to be powerful but slightly lacking in water and therefore a further batch of 5 were ordered, although delayed by the war, and built between June 1915 and October 1916 with extended side tanks, These extended tanks  increased water capacity from 1,090 to 1,256 gallons.
They were used on shunting and short distance goods trips, their small capacity coal bunkers made them unsuitable for longer trips. They were also used on empty stock workings at Victoria and London Bridge.

E2 No. 2104 shunts at the Quay

Work in progress front 3/4 view

Work in Progress rear 3/4 view

The bulk of the E2 can be seen in comparison with the B4 class. The body is yet to be lowered on the chassis slightly.

The later style chassis with added guard irons and sandboxes. The front fixing lugs are yet to be filed smaller to lower the body (The rear lug is likewise reduced)

The front 3/4 view RH side

the RH Side 3/4 view, she awaits some weathering now

Further shunting at the Quay

Following the onset of electrification a number were used as shunters at Southampton Docks and despite their 16ft wheelbase restricting their use in some areas of the docks they stayed working the docks until 1962 when the Class 07 diesels arrived.
Withdrawal of took place between 1961 and 1963.

The Hornby model of the E2 0-6-0 first appeared in 1979 and following 4 versions, LBSC Umber (2 versions) , SR lined Black and SR olive green, production ceased in 1984.   After which the tooling was altered used for the production of some other blue model… dam I wasn’t going to mention that…

Many years ago in my yoof I simply repainted into SR ‘Sunshine’ black, now with Canute Road Quay being an ideal setting for an E2 I decided to dig the E2 out again and give her a quick win makeover, so finescale modellers look away now…

The original chassis was the standard at the time Hornby generic 0-6-0 X04 motor fitted chassis. As this is a quick win project I have decided to not at this stage built a new chassis but simply swap it for the later style of Hornby 0-6-0 generic chassis with its closed frames and smaller motor and slightly greater level of detail. This later chassis is a direct replacement and also gives better running.
To this chassis I have added front sandboxes, made from plastic rectangular section and filed to shape with wire sand pipes, and added front and rear guard irons from plasticard.

The body itself generally matches the correct dimensions for the E2 which was certainly one of the larger 0-6-0 tanks. I have added new brass buffers, pipework, clack valves and lamp irons from various bits and bobs kicking around from the spares / scrap box.
In keeping with the Brighton Style, dating from when the water in the tanks was pre heated, the tank sides were clad and the fixing bolts for the cladding were a visible feature and the E2 was no different. To represent these visible fixings I drilled then glued in 0.45mm wire before cutting the wire almost flush with the tankside.
Just underneath the running plate I have added the long horizontal air tanks on each side, made from plastic rod and some of the piping from brass wire.

The E2 is a large tank when compared to other tanks such as the B4 class, however the body as new does sit slightly too high on the chassis, and this is simply remedied by filing the underside of the front two fixing lugs and also the underside of the single rear sprung lug.

After a dusting with primer from a Halfords aerosol can she received a coat of Halfords Satin Black again from a rattle can before the smokebox and cab roof were brush painted matt black and the bufferbeam of course in red. Her identity as 2104 was added using HMRS Pressfix transfers to complete the look.

I admit she would benefit from a proper finescale chassis, but as a quick win project I think it fits the bill and will extend the life of the Hornby model seeing occasional use on canute Road Quay. A nice 3D print of the E2 with the extended tanks is available and so this might form the basis of a future project…

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As I advised in my recent Covid, exhibitions, mental health and life changes post, in an attempt to restore my modelling mojo whilst on furlough I started to build a number of the wagon kits that I had added to the to do later pile over the last few years.

The Diagram 1410 Covered Goods Wagons awaiting painting

The crispness of the Cambrian Models mouldings can be clearly seen in with this Diagram 1316 open

The finished painted and lettered wagons in pre and post 1936 liveries.

The Diagram 1426 shows of its height against a low roofed Diagram 1410

The kits were all from the excellent Cambrian Models range and comprised of:

  • 4 off ex LSWR 10t Covered Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1410
  • 2 off ex SECR 10t Covered Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1426
  • 1 off ex LSWR 8 plank 12t Open Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1316

These kits are of an excellent standard, with crisp mouldings and assemble quite easily once you have got your head around some of the various options, mainly around the type and number of brakes fitted. As usual I refer to the bibles for Southern wagon builders the “Illustrated History of Southern Wagons” the four volumes are now sadly out of print but are worth tracking down if you don’t already have access to copies.

Although I follow the well written and detailed instructions; I tend to replace the plastic buffer heads with metal replacements from the Alan Gibson range or similar to give additional durability. I also add some cut lead sheet to the underside of the chassis to bring the weight up to approximately 30 grams (around one ounce for older readers) as this improves running. I always fit brass top hat pin point bearings into the axle boxes and use Alan Gibson wheels.
I tend to purchase these kits, wheels etc. either at shows, when we could, or online from H&A Models whom always provide a friendly and efficient service and in these times it’s always good to help and continue to support such excellent traders.

The Hornby Diagram 1543 ‘New’ van showing the incorrect brown and oversize Tare lettering height

The paint dries in the oven

B4 No. 82 runs around the two repainted Hornby Diagram 1543 brake vans.

A very busy scene at Canute Road Quay as all the wagon builds have come to visit

In addition to the above wagons, whilst on a roll, I have finally got round to repainting the two Hornby ex LSWR 20t Warner ‘New’ diagram 1543 brake vans that arrived at the start of year. Whist excellent models the SR versions in this first batch were not finished in the correct shade of SR Brown, also the Tare lettering was incorrectly the same size as the wagon number when it should be smaller. A nice touch by Hornby  is that they provide a separate beautifully printed plate for the “Not to work between Tonbridge and West St. Leonards via Battle” in addition to it being pre printed on the wagon side, so I have affixed these to the repaints.

For all my wagons I tend to follow the same painting process:

  • Firstly for the kit builds I give a dusting of Halford plastic primer from an aerosol ‘rattle’ can
  • I then brush paint the base colour, I prefer to paint two thin coats rather than one heavy coat.
  • I always help dry the paintwork in a warmed oven (set to less than 50 deg and the door kept open, luckily, I don’t need to ask anyone permission first!).
  • In most cases I use lettering from the HMRS Pressfix transfer range and I use a mix of pre (large SR) and post 1936 (small SR) styles to give some variety.
  • Finally, I apply Railmatch Satin Varnish from a rattle can to fix the lettering and even the finish.

Well I said finally, but actually the wagons now await degrees of weathering that I tend to do as a batch and still have to do so for those shown here.

 

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Following on from my recent Talking Stock #38 The Adams B4 tanks post that included a brief history of the prototype and also a review of the recent range of Dapol ready to run models, I have added a few of these to my fleet for Canute Road Quay and therefore renamed and numbered to suit my preferred modelling period.

In all these instances I have not repainted the original model but used my time served method of a good quality enamel thinners applied to the original model printing and then after a soak of around 5 minutes or so rubbing off with a thinners soaked cotton bud. This does leave a shiny finish where the rubbing has been carried, but this is a good surface to apply fresh decals to.

I then leave the model to fully dry in a ventilated area for a day or so to ensure that no traces of the thinners remain. I then applied new decals from a number of sources depending on the model being created.

No. 82 has been repainted from no. 30084  Note the tool boxes have also been relocated to the slightly further forward position as per No.82

No. 89 Trueville

No. 96 ‘Normandy’, repainted into post war condition

For standard Southern Railway post war lettering I use Pressfix transfers from the HMRS Southern Bulleid Sheet 10 as per my backdating of No 30084 to No. 82. Note also that for this identity change I also relocated the tank top tool boxes slightly further forward as per No.82 in real life.

For ‘Trueville’ that utilised No. 90 ‘Caen’ as the base model in Southampton Docks lined brown livery. I used modified Pressfix SR coach lettering, to form all the required letters that I applied individually, also from the HMRS Bulleid sheet 10.

When Normandy left the docks in 1946 she was repainted in to post war black livery at Eastleigh and instead of regaining her number 96, she retained her name but it was applied in Bulleid post war ‘Sunshine’ style. This was obtained from Cambridge Custom Transfers via friend and excellent modeller Matt Wickham. I used the BR version of 30096 as the basis for this backdating.

Once the decals have been applied I spray with Railmatch Satin varnish from a rattle can to both seal the decals and restore a consistent finish, I then like to brush paint the smokebox, chimney, cab roof and cylinders matt black prior to weathering etc.

For those wanting to renumber BR versions, or simply wnating to enhance the fact that Dapol only print the smokebox door number plate directly onto the door with no representation of the number plate, etched plates for all members of the class are available from 247 Developments run by friend and fellow modeller Brian Mosby. 

Hopefully this demonstrates how quick and easy renumbering and renaming can be, as we can not expect a manufacturer to produce every number and variant that we might want. Should a full repaint be required then I have also adopted a reasonably quick and simple process and this is described in my Workbench Wittering #3 post here.

 

 

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Since the announcement by Hornby that the little, and I mean little, Ruston and Hornsby 48DS 0-4-0 diesel mechanical shunter was to be introduced as part of their 2019 range, I always had it in mind that a simple repaint could be on the cards to create the Southern Region departmental shunter DS1169.

Originally built in 1946 as number 237932, she was delivered new to the Bristol Aeroplane Company at Weston-Super-Mare. She was sold to the fledgling British Railways Southern Region in 1948. Her initial home was at Folkestone Warren Permanent Way depot. In 1962 she was transferred to Yeovil Junction before being finally withdrawn in October 1972 and scrapped a year later at George Cohen’s scrapyard at Cranlsy near Kettering in 1973.
She was built as one of the ‘open cab’ style with no doors or side glazing, although she did later had a side window area panelled in along with two piece stable type doors.
Her original livery on the SR was plain drab olive green, including sideframes with red buffer beams (the livery I have chosen to model her in) and later she gained a yellow bonnet which subsequently faded. There is some contention as to whether she was ever repainted although some later photographs do appear to show a darker, possible mid chrome, green base livery.

I have used the Hornby R3706 Army No.802 as the base for this quick win repaint as it is the correct ‘open cab’ style. I simply masked the front and rear windows and radiator grill with vallejo ‘liquid mask’ a similar product to ‘Humbrol Maskol’. The chassis was masked using masking tape rather than removed as this was a simpler and quicker option.
For the main body colour I used an Aerosol Kobra Paint drab olive ‘Camouflage’ and brush panted the buffer beams with Precision Paints P993 satin buffer beam red.

DS1169 was fitted with cast number plates on the cab sides and these have been obtained from my friend Brian Mosby as part of his excellent 247 Developments range of etched plates; that also includes a wide range or SR name plates, smokebox number plates and detailing parts, now also including SR head signal discs.

Some light weathering completes the effect.

See her in action in the short video below

I am not sure how or why she ended up, on loan or possibly on trial, for a while at Southampton Docks and specifically Canute Road Quay but I am sure it must of really happened…

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The August issue No. 146 of Hornby Magazine published last week includes my step by guide on how to simply create concrete inset track exactly as I used on Canute Road Quay.

This follows Canute Road Quay featuring earlier this year in the April 2019 Issue, whilst within the main layout article I briefly described the process I used, this latest article is an illustrated step by step guide, including adding the check rail, using two thicknesses cork sheet, textured paint and an HB pencil to achieve the effect of track work inset in conrete as can be seen in the image left, that I hope will be useful to fellow modellers.

Fellow Souther Railway / Southern Region and Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway enthusiasts will also enjoy, no doubt, the article on the excellent 00 layout of Bournemouth West, which demonstrates superb modelling of the Station and surrounds at Bournmouth West.

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Whilst many when asked about Southampton Docks will generally immediately think of the ex LSWR / Southern Railway docks with ex LSWR B4 0-4-0 tanks and later SR USA tanks, however there were a myriad of rail served private docks and wharves in the area including inner and outer docks and those along the River Itchen such as Dibles Wharf, Notham, Britannia and Victoria wharf,  many of which had their own locomotives.

The recent advent of ready to run industrial tanks, that it has to be said are pretty cute really, such as the Hatton’s Andrew Barclay 14″ 0-6-0t and Hornby W4 Peckett 0-4-0t has opened up a few quick win options for use on Canute Road Quay. One thing I like about many of the locomotives used in such private wharves and quaysides is their use of dumb, usually basic wooden blocks, buffers.

The modified Hattons Andrew Barclay simmers outside the quayside officers at Canute Road Quay

The process for fitting the dumb buffers is to remove the model buffers which are either one piece inserted into the buffer beam or heads and moulded shanks, as per the Hornby Peckett and cutting off the shanks. In both cases any raised detailing on the buffer beam such as rivets etc is filed smooth to enable the replacement wooden dumb buffers that comprise of shaped plastic rectangular section to be glued in place. These are then painted with a grey weathered wood colour paint.

The Hornby Peckett modified with an open cab as well as dumb buffers on Canute Road Quay

With the Hornby W4 Peckett I went one stage further than just replacing the buffers but modifying to one of the open cab versions of the W8 and as per a picture I have seen of such a locomotive at Dibles Wharf in Southampton (I can not post this photograph as I do not own the copyright).

Work in Progress on the W4, Dumb buffers shaped fitted, the cab upper rear removed, and new top ledge fitted and the first brass handrail in place

The cab rear on the Hornby model is a separate moulding, so perhaps an open cab version is on the cards in due course, and I carefully cut the top half away just above the strengthening bar. You can choose to keep the original plastic handrails that extend to the underside of the cab roof but I chose for strength purposes to replace with 0.45mm brass rod. I then added using think plastic micro-strip a top ledge to the now lower cab rear panel.  A crew member has also been fitted.

Dry brush weathering is underway, picture is before the use of a cotton bud to remove some of the dirt

Both models have been weathered in this case using dry brushing techniques, rather than airbrush or weathering powders, and then in many places the weathering rubbed off using a cotton bud. The colours used include: weathered wood on the dumb buffers, brake block dust on the brake blocks, dark rust, roof dirt (essentially dark grey). Area such as the tank and cab sides have the dry brushing removed more than for the example the boiler top where more of a build up of soot etc builds up.

Another view of the Peckett W4 on Canute Road Quay

The modifications I feel give an added dimension and alternative to the out of the box model, and the open cab Hornby W4 Peckett shows off very well the amount of details that Hornby have incorporated within the cab itself.

These industrials and the usual Southern Railway locomotives can be seen at Canute Road Quay’s forthcoming exhibitions appearances: firstly,  the Worthing Model Railway Club exhibition at Durrington High School, The Boulevard, Worthing, West Sussex, BN13 1LA. that is taking place on the weekend of 29th and 30th September 2018; and Secondly, Saturday 3rd November 2018 at Wycrail 18 organised by my own model railway society the High Wycombe and District MRS, being held at Cressex Community School, Cressex Road, High Wycombe, HP12 4UD .  If you are attending either show please drop by and say hello.

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