Tag Archives: T14 class

Picture of the Month – February 2021

This months picture…

A Drummond T14 class ‘Paddlebox’ 4-6-0 No. 30461 in early British railways livery passes Fisherton Sarum on a rake of Diagram 1774 40T ballast hoppers. The T14 is a Nucast white metal kit and the ballast hoppers modified Lima models

 

Daffodils and Easter wishes

T14 class No 461 heads west passing the ‘daffodils’ appearing on the embankment between the main line and 21c159 “Sir Archibald Sinclair” waiting on shed.

May the angels protect you, may the sadness forget you, may goodness surround you and may your God always bless you. The budding trees, the new flowers, and birds that sing, whisper to me that it’s Easter, that and supermarkets full of chocolate of all shapes (many irrelevant), sizes and special offers!

Here is wishing a warmth in your firebox for your soul on Easter & always!

Picture of the Month – April 2018

This months picture…

A Drummond T14 class ‘Paddlebox’ 4-6-0 No. 30466 in early British railways livery passes Fisherton Sarum on a rake of Diagram 1774 40T ballast hoppers. The T14 is a Nucast white metakl kit and the ballast hoppers modified Lima models

Picture of the Month – September 2016

This months picture…

Drummond T14 class No. 30461, built from a NuCast kit, is turned at Fisherton Sarum whilst Bulleid Merchant Navy class 21C14 ‘Nederland Line’ built from a Millholme kit, heads to London with the up Devon Belle having taken over the train at Wilton.

Daffodils and Easter wishes

T14 class No 461 heads west passing the ‘daffodils’ appearing on the embankment between the main line and 21c159 “Sir Archibald Sinclair” waiting on shed.

May the angels protect you, may the sadness forget you, may goodness surround you and may your God always bless you. The budding trees, the new flowers, and birds that sing, whisper to me that it’s Easter.

Here is wishing a warmth for your soul on Easter & always!

Happy New Year! First 2016 picture of the Month

Happy New Year, the first picture of the month for 2016 is…

A Drummond T14 4-6-0 “Paddlebox” 461 a NuCast kit heads towards London with a Meldon Quarry Ballast train. The SR Diagram 1774 40T hoppers are modified Lima wagons on new bogies and other details added.

Picture of the Month – June 2015

This months picture…

A Drummond T14 4-6-0 “Paddlebox” 461 a NuCast kit heads towards London with a Meldon Quarry Ballast train. The SR Diagram 1774 40T hoppers are modified LIMA wagons on new bogies and other details. Salisbury Cathedral can be seen in the background

Picture of the Month – February 2015

This months picture…

Drummond T14 class 461 heads South West with a stopper service to Yeovil passing Bulleid Light Pacific Battle of Britain class s21C159 ‘Sir Archibold Sinclair’ on the rear ‘Windsor Castle’ coaling line on shed, so named after the Public House located on the north side of the main line.

Talking Stock #26 The four Urie G16 large tanks

I have a bit of a soft spot for all large tank locomotives and a number of classes of large tanks existed on the Southern Railway such as the H16 4-6-2T, W 2-6-4T, the Z class 0-8-0T that I featured in my Talking Stock# 19 post here and the topic of this post the G16 4-8-0T. The H16 and W classes will I am sure be the subject of future posts.

A Urie G16 class number 494 from a class of four locomotives

The ex London and Southern Western (LSWR) Urie G16 class of four 4-8-0tanks were introduced in 1921, the same year as the larger H16 4-6-2T. The two classes shared many common parts such as boilers and fireboxes.
Having eight-coupled wheels of 5′ 1″ diameter, they were clearly intended mainly for hump shunting duties at Feltham yard and spent most of their lives to the shed there. Weighing in at 95 tons they were certainly heavy tanks and with a Tractive Effort of 34,000 were the most powerful locomotives on the LSWR. In common with the T14 4-6-0 ‘Paddleboxes’ and H16 class were the widest steam locomotives in Britain.
At one stage Maunsell was considering building more G16 class locomotives, as only four were originally built, but instead opted for his Z class 0-8-0T. With the introduction of the 0-6-0 diesel shunters in the 1950’s one was withdrawn in 1959, another in 1960 and the final two in December 1962.

My model of 494 is built from a Golden Arrow Productions resin body kit

My model of the G16 makes the odd occasional appearance on Fisherton Sarum which must be a running in turn from Eastleigh works, as Salisbury would have been a bit far for a trip working! It has been constructed from a Golden Arrow Products resin kit mounted on a modified Hornby 8F chassis. This is somewhat of a compromise as the G16s had an evenly spaced 5’1″ driving wheels on 6′ centres whereas the 8F has 4’8″ drivers on unequal spacing. The kit correctly requires the cylinders and valve gear to be relocated further forward and the cylinders inclined. The main connecting rod is therefore relocated to be driven off the second rather than the third axle, this in itself creates another compromise as the large balance weight remaining on the third wheel set is incorrect and not easily rectified (it is not possible to simply swap the second and third wheel sets over as the chassis is driven via the third axle which therefore has the driving gear mounted on it).

As the kit only comprising of the resin body and chassis extension components for the detail items I used: Alan Gibson turned brass handrail knobs; Craftsman Models white metal Drummond style buffers and Urie whistle; brass clack valves, smoke box dart, etched rear spectacle protection bars and injectors from Mainly Trains; various pieces of copper wire for pipe work, plastic section for the bunker rear steps and lamp irons from Bambi staples.

Overall this is a relatively simple body kit, although the chassis modifications might not be for the faint hearted, resulting in a nice model, with a little care.

Talking Stock #18 Drummond’s T14 Class 4-6-0 he had to get one almost right…

I mentioned in my Talking Stock # 17 Drummond’s 4-4-0s more than just T9s!, that whilst Drummond had managed some successful 4-4-0 designs his various 4-6-0’s for the London South Western Railway (LSWR) were somewhat more variable in performance. This was quite worrying as increased passenger loading, the requirement for faster schedules and in general heavier rolling stock increased the demands of the locomotive fleet. His previously introduced 4-6-0 class such as F13, E14, G14 and P14 classes did not live up to the expectations of performance. His final 4-6-0 was T14 class of ten locomotives that performed slightly better than his previous 4-6-0 attempts and gained further improvements once superheated, although coal and water consumption was still relatively high.

T14 number 461 built from a Nu-Cast kit in here post rebuilt form with a stovepipe chimney

Under the auspices of Maunsell the entire class was rebuilt in 1930/1 with raised running pates replacing the driving wheel valance, that lead originally to the class nickname ‘Paddleboxes’, although the smokebox saddle that curved to meet the top of the cylinders and the length of low running plate at the front end was retained. Mechanical lubricators were also fitted that cured the class of the hot axle box issue that blighted all of Drummond’s 4-6-0s.

My T14 class In her alternative guise as number 30461 and early 1948 British Railways livery (well you can only see one side at once)

Even after this rebuilding the class, due to the success of the N15 ‘King Arthur’ class the T14s were generally limited to secondary trains. In 1940 a quirk of fate meant that number 447 received a stovepipe chimney (due to no other being available) and as a result the loco’s steaming ability was improved. Subsequently all but one members of the class were so fitted.

T14 number 30461 running past Fisherton Sarum

My model of T14 number 461 is a Nu-Cast white metal kit and is in fact in early 1948 livery on one side (like a number of my fleet) as number 30641 and ‘British Railways’ in Southern ‘Sunshine’ style lettering as she carried until the early 1950’s.