Category Archives: Fisherton Sarum

Canute Road Quay features in the April 2021 issue of BRM Magazine and Fisherton Sarum makes surprise appearance on BRM TV

I am pleased to advise that Canute Road Quay makes an appearance in the April 2021 issue of BRM Magazine available now for digital subscribers and next Thursday 25th March for the printed version.

I open the article by discussing; how although I usually model the 1946 to 1949 Southern Railway time period but to allow for additional interest and how I have purposely built Canute Road Quay without having any fixed item that dates the period modelled or really identifies the area modelled.
This allows a wider range of rolling stock to be used giving a range of different locomotive traction, classes and livery choices that would be still be applicable to such a quayside location. I then continue to describe the layout itself.

The article, similar to some of my “Making Quay Changes” posts,  covers time periods from the mid 1920s through to the 1960s starting with Southampton Docks liveried Adams B4 0-4-0t  through to the USA 0-6-0 Tanks, industrial locomotives and the Class 07 diesels.

Being only a small layout, the scenic section is only 4ft x 1ft, in this issue of BRM Magazine it joins two other ‘compact’ layouts which is the theme for the issue.

Due to the current Covid restrictions rather than being able to enjoy the company and a new pair of eyes photographing layout, I provided all the photographs myself to go alongside my text.
I have used my Canon G7x camera along with my set of studio lights and spent some time one weekend in January utilising the camaras ability to automatically take a series of ‘Focus Bracketed’ images, i.e. multiple shots from the same position but with slightly different focus point, and then combining them in post processing into one image to give an increased depth of field. Hopefully you will enjoy the article and the accompanying photographs.

As a surprise bonus the April edition of BRM TV that is available for digital subscribers of the BRM magazine this month has Fisherton Sarum as its main layout feature (remind me to teach Howard how to pronounce Sarum..).
It includes video footage, that to be honest I had forgotten had been recorded, from the appearance of Fisherton Sarum at the Doncaster Festival of British Railway Modelling way back in 2012 and also includes another look at some of the images that accompanied the article about the layout in the February 2021 issue of BRM Magazine.

Happy Mother’s Day to all mums especially mine

It’s Mother’s Day today, although it might have become a bit like ‘Clinton’s day” (other card shops are available) it actually originated in the Middle Ages, when the custom developed of allowing people who had moved away from where they grew up to come back to visit their home or ‘mother’ churches, and their mothers, on the fourth Sunday of the Christian festival of Lent.

T14 class No 461 heads west passing the daffodils appearing on the embankment between the main line and 21c159 “Sir Archibald Sinclair” waiting on shed.

This year perhaps the day is more poignant than ever as due to the current restrictions in place Mother’s Day can not for many be the usual family gathering, however for most of us we can still keep in touch, pick up the phone and perhaps also say it flowers.

For those whose Mum is unfortunately no longer with us, then take a moment to smile with a memory as she still lives on in your heart and mind.

Raise a glass to all Mum’s out there but especially mine.

 

 

 

Picture of the Month – February 2021

This months picture…

A Drummond T14 class ‘Paddlebox’ 4-6-0 No. 30461 in early British railways livery passes Fisherton Sarum on a rake of Diagram 1774 40T ballast hoppers. The T14 is a Nucast white metal kit and the ballast hoppers modified Lima models

 

Workbench Witterings #8 Taking a ‘brake’ from wagons rolling of the workbench

As I advised in my recent Covid, exhibitions, mental health and life changes post, in an attempt to restore my modelling mojo whilst on furlough I started to build a number of the wagon kits that I had added to the to do later pile over the last few years.

The Diagram 1410 Covered Goods Wagons awaiting painting

The crispness of the Cambrian Models mouldings can be clearly seen in with this Diagram 1316 open

The finished painted and lettered wagons in pre and post 1936 liveries.

The Diagram 1426 shows of its height against a low roofed Diagram 1410

The kits were all from the excellent Cambrian Models range and comprised of:

  • 4 off ex LSWR 10t Covered Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1410
  • 2 off ex SECR 10t Covered Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1426
  • 1 off ex LSWR 8 plank 12t Open Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1316

These kits are of an excellent standard, with crisp mouldings and assemble quite easily once you have got your head around some of the various options, mainly around the type and number of brakes fitted. As usual I refer to the bibles for Southern wagon builders the “Illustrated History of Southern Wagons” the four volumes are now sadly out of print but are worth tracking down if you don’t already have access to copies.

Although I follow the well written and detailed instructions; I tend to replace the plastic buffer heads with metal replacements from the Alan Gibson range or similar to give additional durability. I also add some cut lead sheet to the underside of the chassis to bring the weight up to approximately 30 grams (around one ounce for older readers) as this improves running. I always fit brass top hat pin point bearings into the axle boxes and use Alan Gibson wheels.
I tend to purchase these kits, wheels etc. either at shows, when we could, or online from H&A Models whom always provide a friendly and efficient service and in these times it’s always good to help and continue to support such excellent traders.

The Hornby Diagram 1543 ‘New’ van showing the incorrect brown and oversize Tare lettering height

The paint dries in the oven

B4 No. 82 runs around the two repainted Hornby Diagram 1543 brake vans.

A very busy scene at Canute Road Quay as all the wagon builds have come to visit

In addition to the above wagons, whilst on a roll, I have finally got round to repainting the two Hornby ex LSWR 20t Warner ‘New’ diagram 1543 brake vans that arrived at the start of year. Whist excellent models the SR versions in this first batch were not finished in the correct shade of SR Brown, also the Tare lettering was incorrectly the same size as the wagon number when it should be smaller. A nice touch by Hornby  is that they provide a separate beautifully printed plate for the “Not to work between Tonbridge and West St. Leonards via Battle” in addition to it being pre printed on the wagon side, so I have affixed these to the repaints.

For all my wagons I tend to follow the same painting process:

  • Firstly for the kit builds I give a dusting of Halford plastic primer from an aerosol ‘rattle’ can
  • I then brush paint the base colour, I prefer to paint two thin coats rather than one heavy coat.
  • I always help dry the paintwork in a warmed oven (set to less than 50 deg and the door kept open, luckily, I don’t need to ask anyone permission first!).
  • In most cases I use lettering from the HMRS Pressfix transfer range and I use a mix of pre (large SR) and post 1936 (small SR) styles to give some variety.
  • Finally, I apply Railmatch Satin Varnish from a rattle can to fix the lettering and even the finish.

Well I said finally, but actually the wagons now await degrees of weathering that I tend to do as a batch and still have to do so for those shown here.

 

75 years on – Marking VE Day – Putting the Southern Railways war effort into perspective

Today marks 75 years since Victory in Europe Day or VE Day.
VE Day is the day on which Allied forces formally announced the surrender of Germany, which brought the Second World War to a close in Europe. The military surrender was first signed on May 7, but a slightly modified document with the final terms was signed on May 8 in Berlin. Celebrations immediately erupted throughout Britain and more than one million people celebrated in the streets. In London, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth appeared on the balcony alongside Prime Minister Winston Churchill.

Too late for printing in many diaries / calendars, in more normal times today was announced as being a Bank Holiday by moving the traditional May Day Bank Holiday Monday to today, although many at the moment must be wondering what is the difference?
Many celebrations and events were planned to mark the 75th Anniversary today, but the current Covid-19 lockdown (stay safe, stay at home and thank the NHS) has changed those plans.
Her Majesty the Queen will address the nation at 9pm, the exact time the Queen’s father, King George VI, made a radio announcement declaring the end of the war on the continent in May 1945, and I hope you will join the 2 minutes silence at 11 am this morning as we remember the sacrifices made by all.

The cover of the May 1945 Southern Railway Magazine. Note that it includes an image of 21C11 General Steam Navigation. (click the menu link above to find out more about the Restoration Society and it’s aim to restore 35011 back to this original condition)

By its obvious geographical nature the Southern Railway paid a vital part in the entire war effort. The dedication and efforts of the railway workers that worked tirelessly, in all too often difficult and life threatening conditions themselves, indeed many did also fall, should be remembered along with the military personnel.

In this post I provide details in numbers* of the efforts made under wartime conditions to put things into to perspective. Many will be familiar with some of the major events in which the railway played such a large part such as Operation Dynamo, the mass moving of personnel from Dunkirk 80 years ago at the end of this month, and of course Operation Overlord, the planning, logistics for the moment of men and machines to support D-Day in June 1944. For the Southern Railway it wasn’t just these two events but a continued effort for the duration.

Although the overall number of Southern Railway staff when compared between 1939 (67,680) and 1945 (67,570) didn’t change that much the number of women employed increased from 1,861 to 9,167. The company managed to maintain an operational workforce despite 10,956 men and 212 women being enlisted to active service during the same period.

The Southern Railway was to suffer severe damage, disproportionate to that of its three rivals. From July 1940 to March 1945, the LNER suffered 1737 incidents of enemy damage; the LMS experienced 1939 and the GWR fell victim to 1202. But in the same time the Southern Railway, covering a much smaller route mileage than the others, recorded 3637 incidents of damage through enemy action. This amounts to 170 incidents per 100 miles.

Between 1939 and VE Day the Southern Railway had moved 9,367,886 military personnel on 30,890 special troop trains, an additional 6,269,160 on duty service staff were carried on ordinary trains. 1,797 Ambulance trains carried 408,051 wounded. An additional 35,360 military freight trains were run.
At the outbreak of war the Southern Railway had 1,819 locomotives, 61 were built during the war comprising of: 1 Q Class 0-6-0, 40 Q1 class 0-6-0, 20 Merchant Navy Class 4-6-2 and 4 West Country Class 4-6-2. Whilst only 1 locomotive was destroyed by enemy action, 189 were damaged. A further 130 locomotives were built for other railway companies.
153 Carriages were destroyed by enemy action (Steam 49, Electric 93 and 11 NPCS), whilst 4,040 were damaged (Steam 1,806, Electric 1,784 and 450 NPCS).
An amazing 13,820 wagons were constructed: 7,500 for SR, 1,755 for LMS, 2,230 for LNER, 650 for GWR and 1,885 for Government WD of which 1,600 went overseas. 169 wagons were destroyed by enemy action, along with 69 Private Owner wagons, those damaged amounted to 1,355 along with 800 PO wagons.

At 11am this morning we should remember the 387 Southern Railway staff killed whilst on active service and 170 killed whilst on railway duty. A further 687 men and 59 women were injured by enemy action on duty.

I hope this post allows a pause for thought and reflection on the immense efforts and sacrifices made at the time.

*Source: War on the line: The Southern Railway in wartime, Bernard Darwin, published 1946