Posts Tagged ‘Adams’

This weekend at the second Gauge 0 Guild Virtual exhibition, Dapol announced that they are to produce an 0 Gauge version of the ex LSWR/SR/BR 0-4-0 Dock tank, These follow from their well received 00 gauge range, you can read my review here.

The B4 Class were produced in 3 batches (all overall classed as B4) commencing in 1891 as follows:B4 batch numbers 85 to 94D6, batch, finished in 1892, numbers 81, 95 to 100, 102, 103, 76, K14 batch, built 1907, numbers 82-4, 746/7 (later renumbered 101, 147).
Each batch had detail differences between them especially the last batch of 5 which had Drummond style boilers rather than Adams style, other detail differences included open / closed cab, cab roof profile (K14 batch) and buffers (appears to vary over lifetime).

Dapol have are initially producing six models in the first production batch:

  • 7S-018-001 – L & SWR B4 0-4-0T “NORMANDY” – As Preserved – Open Cab
  • 7S-018-002 – L & SWR B4 0-4-0T “CAEN” Southampton Docks lined brown 90
  • 7S-018-003 – B4 0-4-0T SOUTHERN Black 88
  • 7S-018-004 – B4 0-4-0T (Drummond Boiler) BR Early Emblem 30084
  • 7S-018-005 – B4 0-4-0T BR Late Crest 30096
  • 7S-018-006 – L & SWR B4 0-4-0T Lined Green 91

Normandy in preservation has an open cab whilst 88 and 90 both had closed cabs. 30096 before preservation in BR days had a closed cab that differs from 88 and 90 as it was modified from an open cab at the start of the war. 30084 being part of the later K14 batch originally had a Drummond boiler with dome mounted safety valves and a Drummond style chimney rather than the Adams stove pipe.

Dapol advise that the tooling will allow for four cab types, two different boilers, two forms of chimney as well as other prototypical features catered for such as water injectors and buffers. Hopefully but yet to be confirmed the 0 Gauge versions might also include, features missing / needing improvement: such as the tool box positions, extended lower middle lamp iron from the base of the smokebox and correct some of the cab sheets details, although again this might required more that four cab variants.

The specification includes:

  • Slide in PCB – With space for 2 x sugar cube speakers and a 21 pin decoder socket
  • Removable cab roof held in place with magnets to allow easy crew insertion
  • Highly detailed cab interior with fire box glow
  • High torque five pole skew wound motor driving the rear wheels
  • Fully compensated die-cast chassis to give excellent running capabilities
  • All wheel pick up
  • DCC Ready, DCC Fitted and DCC Sound Fitted models available

Expected Q2 in 2022.

Firstly, no I am not going to upsize Canute Road Quay and secondly more information about the B4 class can be read in my Talking Stock #38 Post here.

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The ’00’ Works have produced a number of small batches of hand built Ready to Run locomotives including a variety of Southern classes, including most recently the LSWR 0330 classex London and South Western Drummond K10 4-4-0 and  ex LSWR Drummond D15 4-4-0 and also ex London Brighton and South Coast Railway Marsh I3 4-4-2 Tanks and They also produced, before Hornby, a brass Devon Belle Observation car which graces Fisherton Sarum.
The ’00’works have announced that they are to produce three versions of the ex London and South Western Railway Adams A12 class of 0-4-2 locomotives. There were eventually 90 members of the A12 class built in two batches, the first thirty  between 1887 and 1889 at  Nine Elms works had screw reversers,  with a further 60, with lever reversers, between 1892 and 1895 with 40 being built by the contractors Neilson & Co. They were known as Adams “Jubilees” as the first built in 1887 being the 50th year Jubilee of the Queen Victoria’s reign.
There were a number of details differences, as well the reverser between members of the class that included sanding arrangements, chimney’s (two types of stove pipe and later cast Drummond type) and tenders (small or large 3,000 gallon or 3,300 gallon). They were based at Nine Elms, Guildford, Basingstoke, Yeovil, Exmouth Junction, Strawberry Hill, Salisbury, Wadebridge and Plymouth, they proved successful and popular. Despite the great success of these 90 engines they were the only ones of 0-4-2 wheel arrangement that were ever built by or for the LSWR.

Withdrawals started in 1928 but four of the Neilson engines 618, 627, 629 & 636 survived into British Railways ownership but only just! One of these, 629, was one of seven locomotives withdrawn in January 1939 but reprieved in October of that year due to the increased demand for locomotives following the outbreak of war in September 1939. None of these four survivors carried a British Railways number. There was one other to exist longer in departmental use supplying steam to Eastleigh boiler yard as DS3191 (Ex No. 612) until November 1951.

The initial CAD 3D render published by 00 Works.

A12 No. 528 in SR Olive Green livery is turned on shed at Fisherton Sarum. She is built from a Nu-Cast kit

A12 No. 652 works a local stopping passenger on Fisherton Sarum

Initially three versions are being produced, due for production this year, with pre-orders available to be taken via their website:

  • LSWR Holly Green Lined No. 361, although the class would have been in LSWR passenger green liveries (Holly green was an LSWR Goods loco livery), that she would have carried until March 1925 when she gained SR Olive Green livery.
  • SR Olive Green No. 598 as she ran between between May 1925 and July 1934 if she has the ‘E’ prefix or between July 1934 and c1941 if without ‘E’ prefix (not confirmed at time of writing)
  • SR/BR Black [Sunshine] No. 629 as she carried c1941 and withdrawal in December 1948 (she had originally been withdrawn in January 1939 but reinstated in October the same year).

The will no doubt follow the earlier releases and will comprise of an all Metal cast body and fitted with a Coreless motor. The A12 will also come fitted with slimline Bachmann/Hornby type couplings which can be unscrewed to replace if required. Delivery is expected Summer 2021.

Previously the A12 was only available as a Nu-Cast white metal kit and a I have couple that could often be seen on Fisherton Sarum.

Past Southern locomotive produced by the ’00’ Works, some of which have since been produced or announced by the major manufacturers, has in addition to the 0330, K10,D15 and I3 mentioned above, included: N15, 700, C, H,  E4 and Adams Radial classes. The level of detail of these models has steadily improved over time, although is still not as high as we seem from the likes of Hornby or Bachmann, they have in the past filled gaps in the market and they should be applauded for taking on another LSWR / Southern prototype.

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Following on from my recent Talking Stock #38 The Adams B4 tanks post that included a brief history of the prototype and also a review of the recent range of Dapol ready to run models, I have added a few of these to my fleet for Canute Road Quay and therefore renamed and numbered to suit my preferred modelling period.

In all these instances I have not repainted the original model but used my time served method of a good quality enamel thinners applied to the original model printing and then after a soak of around 5 minutes or so rubbing off with a thinners soaked cotton bud. This does leave a shiny finish where the rubbing has been carried, but this is a good surface to apply fresh decals to.

I then leave the model to fully dry in a ventilated area for a day or so to ensure that no traces of the thinners remain. I then applied new decals from a number of sources depending on the model being created.

No. 82 has been repainted from no. 30084  Note the tool boxes have also been relocated to the slightly further forward position as per No.82

No. 89 Trueville

No. 96 ‘Normandy’, repainted into post war condition

For standard Southern Railway post war lettering I use Pressfix transfers from the HMRS Southern Bulleid Sheet 10 as per my backdating of No 30084 to No. 82. Note also that for this identity change I also relocated the tank top tool boxes slightly further forward as per No.82 in real life.

For ‘Trueville’ that utilised No. 90 ‘Caen’ as the base model in Southampton Docks lined brown livery. I used modified Pressfix SR coach lettering, to form all the required letters that I applied individually, also from the HMRS Bulleid sheet 10.

When Normandy left the docks in 1946 she was repainted in to post war black livery at Eastleigh and instead of regaining her number 96, she retained her name but it was applied in Bulleid post war ‘Sunshine’ style. This was obtained from Cambridge Custom Transfers via friend and excellent modeller Matt Wickham. I used the BR version of 30096 as the basis for this backdating.

Once the decals have been applied I spray with Railmatch Satin varnish from a rattle can to both seal the decals and restore a consistent finish, I then like to brush paint the smokebox, chimney, cab roof and cylinders matt black prior to weathering etc.

For those wanting to renumber BR versions, or simply wnating to enhance the fact that Dapol only print the smokebox door number plate directly onto the door with no representation of the number plate, etched plates for all members of the class are available from 247 Developments run by friend and fellow modeller Brian Mosby. 

Hopefully this demonstrates how quick and easy renumbering and renaming can be, as we can not expect a manufacturer to produce every number and variant that we might want. Should a full repaint be required then I have also adopted a reasonably quick and simple process and this is described in my Workbench Wittering #3 post here.

 

 

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This months picture…

An ex LSWR Adams B4 0-4-0T No. 100 shunts alongside the warehouse at Canute Road Quay. The B4 is a McGowen white metal kit.

PS. Happy we got rid American Independence Day to my USA readers on the 4th,  a date that is over shadowed this year by my own 50th birthday…

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This months picture…

ex Adams 0395 class No. 3441, a Salisbury pilot locomotive rests between duties at Fisherton Sarum. She is built from a DJH kit.

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The Dapol ex LSWR B4 class 0-4-0t were first announced back in March 2014 and the first versions arrived in June last year.  Yesterday Dapol announced further livery and detail variants, as below,  including the first appearance of the Drummond Boiler fitted and one of the 5 off Drummond K14 versions.

I have a number of these models running on Canute Road Quay, although a couple of which were ‘;Dead on Arrival’ I was able to fix them and they have proved to be nice runners.

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This months picture…

ex LSWR Adams T1 Class -4-4t No.10 shunts the stores wagon on the turntable at Fisherton Sarum. She is built from a Craftsman white metal kit. (PS since the picture was taken the T1 model has had it’s done modified  to the correct Adams’ version.)

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This months picture…

An ex LSWR Adams B4 0-4-0T No. 100 takes on water at the small sub shed at Canute Road Quay. The B4 is a McGowen white metal kit.

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This months picture…

ex LSWR Adams 0395 class 0-6-0 No 3441 awaits her next pilot turn on Fisherton Sarum. She is built from a DJH white metal kit.

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Ok it is not the proper Atlantic Coast Express , but I’m off for a much welcome summer break to a lovely island where the main airport code is coincidental ACE! Anywho, before I depart for some sun, sea, volcanoes and relaxation I will also leave you with a photo review and few very quick initial thoughts on the new Dapol ex LSWR Adams B4 0-4-0t in 00

Merchant Navy 21C6 complete with ACE headboard on Fisherton Sarum

The Atlantic Coast Express was probably the most misnamed of all the Southern Railway named trains but was a stroke of genius at the same time. Why misnamed you might ask, well of the ten different termini served by the train there was only one that was actually on the Atlantic Coast itself!  The genius of the name, however, a result of a competition run in the Southern Railway staff magazine in 1924 credited to Guard F. Rowland* of Woking, was its simple initials ‘ACE’.

Moving on to the Dapol ex LSWR Adams B4 0-4-0t, first announced in March 2014  it has now hit the retailers.

Dapol B4 No. 88

My immediate first impression is that the model is quite light, certainly lighter than recent small tank releases such as the Horny Peckett and the Hatton’s Andrew Barclay. Despite the lack of weight they have run nicely albeit briefly on Canute Road Quay.

A rear 3/4 view of No. 88

The B4s were not a large class but as usual were a minefield of subtle and not so subtle variations over time such as: cabs, boilers, chimneys and buffers.

A view of BR late crest version No. 30096. Note the larger buffers (none are sprung) and different style cab

Dapol have tooled for some of these variations but have also managed at first glance to achieve a few errors including: possibly the number of boiler bands, variation combinations not appropriate to the particular livery (such as buffer head sizes), missing injector, missing front middle lamp iron (as fitted to some prototypes at the base of the smokebox door) and the cab ventilation holes just under the roof line front and rear are raised mouldings rather than actual holes (a possible translation from CAD to tool issue).

B4s No. 30089 and 30096 front comparison

I also note that on the BR livery version the smokebox door number plate is unusually completely a transfer rather printing on a moulded or an etched plate (although this may possibly be an advantage to those like me that will be repainting into an earlier livery).

Rear cab comparison between No. 30096 and 30089

There is also a pronounced joint line apparent around the front of the smokebox.

Electrical Pick ups are, as you would expect and indeed necessary, wipers on all the rear of four wheels with an open slew wound five pole motor (rather than now more common can motors) driving the rear axle via a flywheel and gear tower.

A trio of B4s

It also features a firebox glow which is quite dim, especially at low speeds on DC but might appear consistently brighter on DCC. No separate items are supplied for the owner to fit, with thee exception of a  unique very wide replacement tension lock coupling bar, but I am not convinced it will work well in conjunction with the lightly sprung close coupling NEM pocket.

Despite the initial comments above, I am sure the Dapol B4 will still be popular with most SR modellers and from normal viewing distances looks ok and runs well.

Normal service of posting will be back in a couple of weeks, with perhaps more on the B4 and also some views of the Heljan 07.

 *footnote, it is unfortunate to record that Guard Roland although based at Woking at the time of the competition moved shortly after to Torrington (one of the ACE’s destinations) but sadly just six years later became the only person to killed on the North Cornwall Railway due to a shunting accident.

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