Posts Tagged ‘Dapol’

The attractive Wainwright D class 4-4-0 from Retailer Rails Of Sheffield  in partnership with Dapol and Locomotion Models that was announced in October 2019 has now arrived.  Hopeful the images within this post will show how well the model looks and perpetuates the elegance.

The elegance of the D Class is clearly captured

The right hand side of 1734 with the high level of details clear to see

A total of 51 of these elegant D Class 4-4-0s were built in a number batches between 1901 and 1907 and were built by a range of manufacturers. The first 20 being split between Sharp Stewart and Ashford, the next ten by Dubs & Co, followed by ten split between Stephenson & Co and the Vulcan Foundry, the final eleven being once again built at Ashford. Initial duties included the main express services on all the SECR primary routes. Following grouping and the introduction of newer classes such as the N15s they were transferred to secondary services such as Brighton, Redhill, and Basingstoke stopper services.
The main withdrawal commenced in the early 1950s with the last six being based ay Guildford shed working Redhill – Reading services until 1956. Number 737 was saved for preservation as part of the National Collection and cosmetically restored to SECR livery and condition.
During the 1920s Maunsell rebuilt 21 as the D1 class with a larger Belpaire firebox, superheating, new  piston valves a Maunsell style cab. Whilst improving efficiency and performance the rebuilds certainly lost much of the elegance.

Six versions were originally available via Rails of Sheffield

  • 4S-027-001 Wainwright D Class SECR Green 4-4-0 Steam Locomotive No.488 [Now Sold out]
  • 4S-027-002 Wainwright D Class Southern Lined Maunsell Olive Green 4-4-0 Steam Locomotive No.1730 (early style lining)
  • 4S-027-003 Wainwright D Class BR Sunshine Black 4-4-0 Steam Locomotive No.31731
  • 4S-027-004 Wainwright D Class BR Lined Black Early Crest 4-4-0 Steam Locomotive No.31574 [Now Sold out]
  • 4S-027-005 Wainwright D Class SECR Grey (Scraped Beading) 4-4-0 Steam Locomotive No.726
  • 4S-027-006 Wainwright D Class Southern Sunshine 4-4-0 Steam Locomotive No.1734

A model of No.737 as preserved at the Railway Museum is available via Locomotion Models.

A rear 3/4 view of 1734

The well detailed and decorated cab and the push fit drawbar.

The very nice representation of the motion between the frames under the boiler

The front face of the D Class showing the randomly silver smokebox door hinge and coupling hook

A close up of the right hand side of 1734

The dimensionally accurate model certainly captures the Wainwright elegance wonderfully well with an excellent detail. It features a five pole motor driving the front driving axle and a the now standard Dapol ‘pinless’ click to couple drawbar that also carries the electrical connections. Electrical pick up is on all tender wheels as well as the locomotive driving wheels. For those using DCC the model has Next-18 Decoder socket mounted on a pull out PCB behind the smokebox door with space for a 15mm x 11mm cube speaker, plus provision for customer to fit a larger bass speaker in tender. The loco also features the current gimmick of a firebox flicker although on DC you would hardly know its there .
The level of detail is wonderful including a good representation of the inside valve gear between the frames, well modelled and decorated cab details even down to the padlocks on the tender tool lockers. Separately applied items include lamp irons, pipe work, handrails and factory fitted brake rodding on both loco and tender. The buffers (once you have fitted the tender buffer back on that often appears to be loose in purchasers boxes) are sprung. The the slightly plasticly coal, is not so much removable as needs something to stop it falling off the model, and the water tank and limited coal space on these engines is modelled underneath it.
An accessory bag supplied with the model includes: cab doors, front guard irons and steam pipes and pipework (incorrectly names as vacuum pipes in the supplied owners manual), along with a ‘tool’ for pulling out the DCC PCB in the smokebox for what Dapol call their ‘Tool-less’ system (begs the question when is a tool not a tool?).
The tooling appears to allow for at least two chimneys. When first introduced they were fitted with tall copper capped chimneys. Circa the1910s they fitted with a shorter larger diameter capuchon chimney, that were then  gradually replaced with a plain topped version after Grouping, although 1493 kept the capuchon chimney until withdrawal. With this model in the wartime SR Sunshine black livery it is unlikely to have still been fitted with a capuchon chimney (unless I can find a dated picture).  The BR Lined black version also has the same incorrect chimney.

The replacement wheelset, tool and spare traction tyres

When announced the Engineering Prototype shown included a diecast boiler and smokebox, model  4-4-0s are notoriously difficult to balance, the boiler and smokebox on the production models first appeared to be plastic, with the loco minus tender only weighing 155g, and traction tyres fitted on the front driving wheels. Having now taken the model apart it does seem to still be die cast. The change to fit traction tyres only came to light publicly when the models started to be delivered, so is no different than a Hornby T9 in that respect.
Possibly if a more traditional DDC approach with the socket etc. hidden inside the tender, rather than the smokebox and some of the boiler, more space might have been available for more weight. As a compromise, and to be fair a nice touch, the model has been supplied with a non traction tyre fitted drop in wheelset (along with a tool for undoing the crank pin screws.
It has also been noted that on my model the front traction tyre fitted wheelset has blackened rims whilst the rear drivers are not blackened. This is possibly as a result of the late change to fit traction tyres as the spare wheelset supplied matches the rear driving wheels i.e. no blackened rim. Also supplied are spare traction tyres. The model runs smoothly and quietly on the limited space on Canute Road Quay although I have not been able to test its haulage capacity.
A number of the models have also demonstrated a notable difference in height between the tender and loco running plates. My example is not as noticeable as some. It appears to depend on the fit of the loco body at the rear of the chassis, I am led to believe that all the models have has some form of work carried out on them in the UK to ensure the loco to tender drawbar connects correctly and the rear chassis screw tightness is part of the fix.

A side on view of 1734 the overscale lettering and numbers are clear to see

The other elephant in the room is the decoration: on my model pictured the Sunshine lettering and number style character height is 3.71mm when they should be a scale 9″ high i.e. 3mm and also the green shading is over weight further emphasising the oversize and immediately detracts to my eye, and I will have to replace them at some stage, some of the metal work has been picked out in bright silver paint, including the coupling hook and randomly part of the smokebox door hinge and will need toning down.
From photos I have seen the SR olive green version, as well as the odd shade of green, has an issue in some areas with registration of the lining and also the number font on the tender not a correct representation of the SR number font, the ‘3’ should be completely curved version and is to heavy weight The RH side tender emblem on BR lined version faces the wrong and also suffers from the number font being too heavy and therefore the over width of the numbers is too wide.

So my D Class will need to get in to the workbench queue to have the chimney corrected and the lettering and numbers replaced along with the toning down of some of the random silver paintwork and generally weathered.

Overall, despite the livery niggles and the slightly disappointing overall weight and the need for traction tyres the Rails Of Sheffield  in partnership with Dapol Wainwright D Class 4-4-0 is a lovely model with some great detail and a welcome addition for pre-grouping / SR modellers especially those modelling the Eastern Section and will be a good stable mate for the Bachmann C class, Hattons P Class and the Hornby H class.

 

 

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First announced in October 2019 and following amendments to the first livery samples, examples of all seven versions of the South Eastern & Chatham Railway D Class 4-4-0 from the Dapol production line have been received by Locomotion Models and Rails of Sheffield. These have now completed extensive running trials and final checking. Following approval, shipping from the factory can now commence.

Six versions are available to Pre-order through Rails of Sheffield:

  • 4S-027-001 Wainwright D Class SECR Green 4-4-0 Steam Locomotive No.488 (Pre Grouping Silk Finish)
  • 4S-027-002 Wainwright D Class Southern Lined Maunsell Olive Green 4-4-0 Steam Locomotive No.1730
  • 4S-027-003 Wainwright D Class BR Sunshine Black 4-4-0 Steam Locomotive No.31731
  • 4S-027-004 Wainwright D Class BR Lined Black Early Crest 4-4-0 Steam Locomotive No.31574
  • 4S-027-005 Wainwright D Class SECR Grey (Scraped Beading) 4-4-0 Steam Locomotive No.726
  • 4S-027-006 Wainwright D Class Southern Sunshine 4-4-0 Steam Locomotive No.1734

The preserved example No. 737 is currently on display at the National Railway Museum, York. This locomotive has been produced exclusively for Locomotion Models, which is part of the National Railway Museum.

On the whole these look very good and I am looking to receiving my SR Sunshine version (although I will be renumbering as the numbers size shown above do appear to be slightly too large). Definite improvements have been made since the initial livery samples were shown, especially with the colour rendition of SR Olive and the toning down of the bright handrails on some versions (although strangely not the BR lined black version). The only other issue that has been noted is also with respect to the BR lined black version in that the cycling lion early emblem is facing backwards on the right hand side, at the time these emblems usually faced forwards on both sides as it does on at least one photo I have seen for 31574. As these are production samples it is likely to be too late to amend this.

 

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This weekend at the second Gauge 0 Guild Virtual exhibition, Dapol announced that they are to produce an 0 Gauge version of the ex LSWR/SR/BR 0-4-0 Dock tank, These follow from their well received 00 gauge range, you can read my review here.

The B4 Class were produced in 3 batches (all overall classed as B4) commencing in 1891 as follows:B4 batch numbers 85 to 94D6, batch, finished in 1892, numbers 81, 95 to 100, 102, 103, 76, K14 batch, built 1907, numbers 82-4, 746/7 (later renumbered 101, 147).
Each batch had detail differences between them especially the last batch of 5 which had Drummond style boilers rather than Adams style, other detail differences included open / closed cab, cab roof profile (K14 batch) and buffers (appears to vary over lifetime).

Dapol have are initially producing six models in the first production batch:

  • 7S-018-001 – L & SWR B4 0-4-0T “NORMANDY” – As Preserved – Open Cab
  • 7S-018-002 – L & SWR B4 0-4-0T “CAEN” Southampton Docks lined brown 90
  • 7S-018-003 – B4 0-4-0T SOUTHERN Black 88
  • 7S-018-004 – B4 0-4-0T (Drummond Boiler) BR Early Emblem 30084
  • 7S-018-005 – B4 0-4-0T BR Late Crest 30096
  • 7S-018-006 – L & SWR B4 0-4-0T Lined Green 91

Normandy in preservation has an open cab whilst 88 and 90 both had closed cabs. 30096 before preservation in BR days had a closed cab that differs from 88 and 90 as it was modified from an open cab at the start of the war. 30084 being part of the later K14 batch originally had a Drummond boiler with dome mounted safety valves and a Drummond style chimney rather than the Adams stove pipe.

Dapol advise that the tooling will allow for four cab types, two different boilers, two forms of chimney as well as other prototypical features catered for such as water injectors and buffers. Hopefully but yet to be confirmed the 0 Gauge versions might also include, features missing / needing improvement: such as the tool box positions, extended lower middle lamp iron from the base of the smokebox and correct some of the cab sheets details, although again this might required more that four cab variants.

The specification includes:

  • Slide in PCB – With space for 2 x sugar cube speakers and a 21 pin decoder socket
  • Removable cab roof held in place with magnets to allow easy crew insertion
  • Highly detailed cab interior with fire box glow
  • High torque five pole skew wound motor driving the rear wheels
  • Fully compensated die-cast chassis to give excellent running capabilities
  • All wheel pick up
  • DCC Ready, DCC Fitted and DCC Sound Fitted models available

Expected Q2 in 2022.

Firstly, no I am not going to upsize Canute Road Quay and secondly more information about the B4 class can be read in my Talking Stock #38 Post here.

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Dapol have released an update on the development of their all new ex LSWR/SR/BR M7 0-4-4T along with images of their latest Engineering Prototype.

A total of 105 Drummond LSWR M7 0-4-0 passenger tank locomotives were built between 1897 and 1911. They were built in a number of batches with detail differences. The first batch had a short overhang at the front, sandboxes combined with the front splashers. In 1900 the design was changed to have the sandboxes inside the smokebox. The 1903 batch had  a long overhang on the front end. During 1904 and 1905 construction moved the sandboxes back to the front splasher. It was some of those that had the longer frames that were later fitted for pull-push working.

The models being produced are all short frame versions with sandboxes incorporated into the front splashers. They will feature a highly detailed body with many separately added parts die cast chassis, a 3 pole can motor and all wheel pick up.

Dapol however have advised that “no DCC decoder will supplied in this model”, as they say “the space has been used to add more weight to the model and provide improved, balance, traction and running properties”, by this I assume that no DCC socket will be present either, which I am sure will be seen as a negative factor by many.
[Update 27/07/21] Dapol have provided the DCC fitting update as per image left.

Initially eight versions will be released as part of the first production run as follows:

  • 2S-016-005 M7 0-4-4 Southern Lined Green 37 (I assume Olive Green)
  • 2S-016-006 M7 0-4-4 SWR Lined Green 245 (sic, I assume LSWR)
  • 2S-016-007 M7 0-4-4 Southern Black 246
  • 2S-016-008 M7 0-4-4 British Railways Lined Malachite 30038
  • 2S-016-009 M7 0-4-4 British Railways Lined Black 30248
  • 2S-016-010 M7 0-4-4 BR Early emblem Lined Black 30673
  • 2S-016-011 M7 0-4-4 BR Late Crest Lined Black 30245
  • 2S-016-012 M7 0-4-4 LSWR Lined Green 35

Further details including a video of the running Engineering Prototype can be found on the Dapol website here.

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This is the fourth in a series of ‘Making Quay Changes’ posts with the Canute Road Quay being transported to either a different location or era or both.  It follows my Making Quay Changes #1 post moving the scene Eastwards, and then back to Southampton with my Making Quay Changes #2 post but in the 1950s  and #3 post set in the 1920/30s. We now move somewhere / anywhere in the late 1950s / 60s with industrial locomotives providing the horse power.

Passing Peckets a modified Hornby W4 0-4-0t passes a B2 0-6-0t renamed as ‘O.S.V.Bullied’

A Hornby B2 0-6-0t ‘Leader’ shunts at the quay

a modified Hattons Andrew Barclay 14″ 0-6-0t simmers

Peckett B4 0-6-0t ‘O.V.S. Bullied’ crosses towards the quayside

A pair of Hornby Sentinels pass each other with ‘Cattewater’ passing ‘Graham’

‘Cattewater’ stays on brand shunting an oil tank wagon

the outside cranked ‘Graham’ is on loan from the Oxfordshire Ironstone Co.

ex Class 05 now No.2 pauses at the crossing

Although my usual modelling genre, as regular readers will know, is the Southern Railway between 1946 and 1949, however due to Canute Road Quay has very few visual references to either period or location (yes there are a couple, but hey…) Having deliberately when building Canute Road Quay left the vehicles and other details such as crates, sack stacks and oil drums etc. loose, it enables them to be both be moved around, to give some variety in photographs, and or replaced with other items to different periods.

In this case Canute Road Quay‘s is off the British Railways network and could be any private quayside / wharf. In and around Southampton alone there were a myriad of rail served private docks and wharves including inner and outer docks and those along the River Itchen such as Dibles Wharf, Notham, Britannia and Victoria wharf,  many of which had their own locomotives.

In this case we see a number of locomotives privately operated ranging from steam locomotives to diesel shunters sharing duties around the quay.

The steam locomotives include the the Hornby W4 0-4-0t and B2 0-6-0t Pecketts, and the Hatton’s Andrew Barclay 14″ 0-6-0t both of which I have modified for use on Canute Road Quay. As per my Workbench Witterings #3 post they have been fitted with the use of dumb, usually basic wooden blocks, buffers so often seen at such locations. They remained in surface well into the 1960s and in some cases beyond. My B2 Pecketts have had their identities changed to be ‘O.V.S. Bullied’ and ‘Leader’ (spot the theme…), nameplates obtained from my friends at 247 Developments,  and weathered.

The early 1960s saw the introduction of a number of diesel shunters such as the 34 ton chain drive 4 wheel Rolls-Royce diesel powered Sentinel shunter rated at 233hp and the later 325hp, 38 ton style with outside cranks.
The Hornby Esso  4wDM version was introduced in 1963 and was for use in the Esso Bitumen works at Cattewater, hence its name, in Plymouth
‘Graham’ (Hornby must have been tempting me to purchase this one on purpose!) was delivered new to the Oxfordshire Ironstone company as Locomotive No.10207 in May 1965 and was fitted with vacuum braking and a higher ratio gearbox for mainline working, so is obviously on loan to the quayside.
The Hornby models have been modified slightly with the lifting eyes at each end having their holes drilled out, the wasp stripes on ‘Cattewater’ continued on the side of the bufferbeam as per the prototype and also weathered.

Moving towards the late 1960s saw some of the myriad of early BR shunter types being withdrawn and some entering industrial service such as the ex Class 05. This Heljan example is modelled on the second batch built by Hunslet Engine Company of Leeds and built in 1961 numbered D2574 to D2618, had a  higher roof line, smaller wheels (3’4″ instead of 3’9″) deeper buffers with oval heads than the first batch built in 1955. D2578 was sold to HP Bulmers in 1968 and is now preserved, but seen here working at the quay.

I hope you enjoy this post, the next ‘Making Quay Changes’ post with Canute Road Quay  the next such post will be be set in its usual location, but what era will it be…?

 

 

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Although not the usual time period for my blog, I certainly remember the Class 50s on the Waterloo to Exeter line albeit not in this latest livery.

The Kernow Model Rail Centre have today announced they have commissioned Dapol to produce the GBRf Class 50s in N Gauge.

Defiance and Hercules at Eastleigh 20th March 2020 (Picture copyright and courtesy C Trerise)

50 007 “Hercules” and 50 049 “Defiance” were unveiled on 20th March 2019 at Eastleigh following their repainting into GBRf colours.  50 007 was revealed to have 50 014 “Warspite” on one side, much to the delight of Tim Shoveller and Darren Ward who unveiled the change of identity!  The Kernow Model Rail Centre model will reflect this dual-identity, as well as faithfully re-creating the small but important differences between the livery of the two locomotives.

GBRf worked closely with the Class 50 Alliance, the owners of 50 007 and 50 049, in enabling a return to the mainline for their locomotives in 2017 and subsequently through a programme of railtours during 2018 as part of the 50th anniversary celebrations of the Class 50s.

The decision to repaint the locomotives into the striking new livery was a recognition of the developing relationship between the two organisations and marked a new chapter in the story of the Class 50s.  Over the past couple of years, GBRf has invested in a programme of driver training to enable Class 50 operation over most of the UK rail network.

The repaints were carried out by Arlington Fleet Services at Eastleigh. The first outing for the GBRf-liveried Class 50s was on Saturday 23rd March when they worked Pathfinder Tours’ Teminator-Phoenixed railtour from London Paddington to Penzance and return to Waterloo.  This marked 25th years since the final BR operated Class 50 railtour over the same route, The Terminator, which was also promoted by Pathfinder.

Following the repaints, the locomotives have been available to operate selected GBRf trains on a ‘spot-hire’ basis. This work includes movement of locomotives between heritage railway gala events, and future railtours. The locomotives will continue to be based at the Severn Valley Railway, but will have easy access to the national network, thanks to the 24-hour connection at Kidderminster,

Expected in mid 2021, the price for the pack (both models motorised) will be £249.99 for DCC Ready, £299.99 for DCC Fitted and £449.99 for DCC Sound Fitted.

In addition to the above Dapol have this week also announced three new Class 50 liveries as part of its main range, due mid 2021. Like the Kernow Model Rail Centre versions these will be their Next Generation Diesel models, with entirely re-designed chassis and electronics and incorporate a new iron core 5 pole motor.

Liveries announced, including DCC fitted versions, are as follows:

  • Class 50 Defiance 50149 Railfreight Grey Refurbished
  • Class 50 Ajax 50046 Large Logo Refurbished
  • Class 50 Resolution 50018 Late NSE Refurbished

Also announced this week is a new batch of their ex SR Van U / BR Covered Carriage Truck (CCT),  that is being released at the end of this year in: SR Olive, BR(S) Green and BR crimson and BR Blue.

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Dapol have today announced, or in reality re-announced, details of new tooling Maunsell High Window coaches in N gauge.  This is an expansion of the previously released low window versions. They will initially be produced in SR lined olive green and further liveries will be phased in to expand the range.

Three new tooled models cover a six compartment Brake Third (BTK), a Corridor Third (TK), a Corridor Composite (CK) and a Corridor First (FK).

Dapol SR BTK high window

Dapol SR CK high window

Dapol SR TK high window

The proposed releases, all SR Lined Olive Green are as follows:

  • 2P-014-001 Four Coach Set 193 comprising of BTKs nos. 3735 [sic should be 3758] / 3739 and CKs nos. 5640 and 5641 – £124.95
  • 2P-014-002 Six Coach Set 456 comprising of BTKs nos. 4083 / 4084, CK no. 5172, FKs nos. 7398 / 7399 and TK no. 837 – £186.95
  • 2P-014-003 Corridor Brake Third No. 3730 [sic not a Brake Third as their number range started 3732] – £31.95 ea
  • 2P-014-004 Corridor Composite No. 5635 – £31.95 ea
  • 2P-014-005 Corridor First No. 7228 – £31.95 ea
  • 2P-014-006 Corridor Third – £31.95 ea

The images shown are the initial Engineering Prototypes and for illustration only,  Dapol advise that they have already received livery samples and amendments returned to the factory (I hope the BTK number 3735 above is a typo as it should be number 3738, and also the proposed number of the loose BTK 3730 is not a BTK ) with production started and delivery expected by quarter 4 this year.

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This is the third in a series of ‘Making Quay Changes’ posts with the Canute Road Quay being transported to either a different location or era or both.  It follows my Making Quay Changes #1 post moving the scene Eastwards, and then back to Southampton with my Making Quay Changes #2 post but in the 1950s. In this post we remain in the Southampton Docks but in the 1920s heading into the 1930s.

Canute Road Quay in mid 1920s ‘Guernsey’ passes ‘Caen’ showing the two Southampton Docks liveries

‘Caen’ passes ‘Trueville’ both heading into the 1930s

Shunting continues on Canute Road Quay

No.88 in early SR livery visits the Docks shed as ‘Guernsey’ shunts

Although my usual modelling genre, as regular readers will know, is the Southern Railway between 1946 and 1949, however due to Canute Road Quay has very few visual references to either period or location (yes there are a couple, but hey…) It therefore allows me to change the location and era with different rolling stock, vehicles and details.

In this case we have stayed at Canute Road Quay‘s intended setting but time travelled to a time between the wars moving from the roaring 1920s to the uncertain 1930s with the prospect of peace being unsettled and ruining the phrase “the war to end all wars”

Having deliberately when building Canute Road Quay left the vehicles and other details such as crates, sack stacks and oil drums etc. loose, it enables them to be both be moved around, to give some variety in photographs, and or replaced with other items to different periods.

In this case we still see the lovely range of Dapol B4 class 0-4-0 tanks bringing a splash of colour to the scene with the early Southampton Docks lined green livery being replaced during the 1920s with the possibly more familiar lined brown livery that was maintained until the B4 tanks were replaced at the Docks by the USA tanks after the second world war. We also see in this period colourful private owner wagons (before they were nationally pooled and unkempt during WW2).

I hope you enjoy this post, the next ‘Making Quay Changes’ post with Canute Road Quay may or may not be set in its usual location, so where and what era will it be…?

 

 

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Following on from my recent Talking Stock #38 The Adams B4 tanks post that included a brief history of the prototype and also a review of the recent range of Dapol ready to run models, I have added a few of these to my fleet for Canute Road Quay and therefore renamed and numbered to suit my preferred modelling period.

In all these instances I have not repainted the original model but used my time served method of a good quality enamel thinners applied to the original model printing and then after a soak of around 5 minutes or so rubbing off with a thinners soaked cotton bud. This does leave a shiny finish where the rubbing has been carried, but this is a good surface to apply fresh decals to.

I then leave the model to fully dry in a ventilated area for a day or so to ensure that no traces of the thinners remain. I then applied new decals from a number of sources depending on the model being created.

No. 82 has been repainted from no. 30084  Note the tool boxes have also been relocated to the slightly further forward position as per No.82

No. 89 Trueville

No. 96 ‘Normandy’, repainted into post war condition

For standard Southern Railway post war lettering I use Pressfix transfers from the HMRS Southern Bulleid Sheet 10 as per my backdating of No 30084 to No. 82. Note also that for this identity change I also relocated the tank top tool boxes slightly further forward as per No.82 in real life.

For ‘Trueville’ that utilised No. 90 ‘Caen’ as the base model in Southampton Docks lined brown livery. I used modified Pressfix SR coach lettering, to form all the required letters that I applied individually, also from the HMRS Bulleid sheet 10.

When Normandy left the docks in 1946 she was repainted in to post war black livery at Eastleigh and instead of regaining her number 96, she retained her name but it was applied in Bulleid post war ‘Sunshine’ style. This was obtained from Cambridge Custom Transfers via friend and excellent modeller Matt Wickham. I used the BR version of 30096 as the basis for this backdating.

Once the decals have been applied I spray with Railmatch Satin varnish from a rattle can to both seal the decals and restore a consistent finish, I then like to brush paint the smokebox, chimney, cab roof and cylinders matt black prior to weathering etc.

For those wanting to renumber BR versions, or simply wnating to enhance the fact that Dapol only print the smokebox door number plate directly onto the door with no representation of the number plate, etched plates for all members of the class are available from 247 Developments run by friend and fellow modeller Brian Mosby. 

Hopefully this demonstrates how quick and easy renumbering and renaming can be, as we can not expect a manufacturer to produce every number and variant that we might want. Should a full repaint be required then I have also adopted a reasonably quick and simple process and this is described in my Workbench Wittering #3 post here.

 

 

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Due to the expansion of the many small yards and docks the London and South Western Railway (LSWR) required a number of small tank locomotives. First introduced by Adams in 1891 the B4 class of 0-4-0 tanks comprised initially of two batches of ten built at Nine Elms works and the first ten were completed by 1892.

No. 88 of the first batch of 10 B4s in early SR lined livery

When compared with other 0-4-0t of the time the B4 class, were quite large in comparison. Even with their enclosed slightly cramped footplate, limited coal space; were powerful and so became popular with their crews. This first batch entered service across the LSWR network and were numbered 85 to 94

Guernsey’ as first introduced in 1893 in original lined green livery and cutaway cab

No. 96 ‘Normandy’, repainted into post war condition. Note cab differences

No. 90 ‘Caen’ in Docks lined brown livery.

The LSWR absorbed the Southampton Dock Company in November 1892 and it soon became clear that more powerful shunting locomotives would be required after a trial with one of the first batch of B4s, the first two of the second batch of ten were assigned to the Docks. In keeping with the existing Docks engines they were constructed with cut away cabs with a single central circular window, and carried names ‘Guernsey’ and ‘Jersey’ rather than numbers (later 176 and 81 respectively) and arrived, painted in a lined green livery, in the ‘Docks in November 1983. Of the remaining second batch numbers 95 to 100, 102 & 103, two more were built with the cut away cabs for the Docks becoming ‘Normandy’ (96) and ‘Brittany’ (97).
Between February and April 1896 a further four B4s were transferred to the docks and therefore also modified with cutaway cabs and names these were No.86 ‘Havre’, 93 ‘St Malo’, 95 ‘Honfleur’ and 102 ‘Granville’
Four more B4s made their way to docks, retaining their enclosed cabs: No. 85 becoming ‘Alderney’ and 98 ‘Cherbourg’ in April 1900 along with No.89 ‘Trouville’ and 90 ‘Caen in March 1901.

The livery of the B4s within the Docks changed during the 1920s from the in essence LSWR green livery to that of Brown with red lining and this remained as such, even post Grouping, until they left the Docks in 1946 where they gained standard Southern Railway livery of the time as per their non dock counterparts.

One of the Drummond K14 class later to be reclassified B4 class note the cab roof profile and dome mounted safety valves

During 1908 a further five shunting engines were introduced by Drummond, seventeen years after the first Adams B4s, there were initially classed as K14s but were essentially B4s with Drummond style boilers (identifiable by dome mounted safety valves) , chimneys and a slightly different cab roof  profile. The first two were sent to Southampton Docks and named ‘Dinard (147) and ‘Dinan’ (101). The rest were numbered 82 to 84. they were soon reclassified as members of the B4 class.

No.89 Trueville Note the linseed filtrator behind the dome

During their lifetime a few changes were made such as those in the Docks being fitted with a linseed filtrator that was mounted on the boiler to counter issues with the use of the sources of water used at the docks between 1901 and the early 1940s.
During the 1920s those cutaway cabs had the drivers side front sheet filled in and also acquiring side sheets of various homemade designs. Proper metal front and side sheets were eventually fitted to all for blackout purposes during the war.
The Adams and Drummond boilers were interchangeable and therefore during their life time some Adams built versions carried Drummond boilers and visa-versa, it is therefore important to refer to records and or photographs when considering a chosen prototype and period.

Dols B4 No. 87 and K14 No. 30084 for comparison

Dapol No. 87 and 96 for comparison

Dapol cab rears showing different tooling

B4s No. 30089 and 30096 front comparison

A trio of the Dapol B4s

Those pictured on this post are based on the recent two batches of Dapol and some of its variations. Dapol have tooled for some of the variations for a number of variations including four cab styles, Adams and Drummond boilers, buffer head sizes and different chimneys, however some compromises have been made and therefore there are a few errors including: possibly the number of boiler bands, variation combinations not appropriate to the particular livery (such as buffer head sizes), missing injector, missing front middle lamp iron (as fitted to some prototypes at the base of the smokebox door) and the cab ventilation holes just under the roof line front and rear are raised mouldings rather than actual holes (a possible translation from CAD to tool issue).

I also note that on the BR livery version the smokebox door number plate is unusually completely a transfer rather printing on a moulded or an etched plate (although this may possibly be an advantage to those like me that are repainting into an earlier livery).Etched plates for all members of the class are available from 247 Developments run by friend and fellow modeller Brian Mosby.  

Electrical Pick ups are, as you would expect and indeed necessary, wipers on all the rear of four wheels with an open slew wound five pole motor (rather than now more common can motors) driving the rear axle via a flywheel and gear tower. The front axle being sprung.

It also features a firebox glow which is quite dim, especially at low speeds on DC but might appear consistently brighter on DCC. No separate items are supplied for the owner to fit, with the exception of a unique very wide replacement tension lock coupling bar.
It should also be noted that of the seven Dapol models I have purchased two were dead on arrival (due to a misassembled bearing and a broken cylinder mounting bracket) that I fixed myself, and on Guernsey the cab rear panel was not seated properly leaving one of the handrails loose, but easily rectified. No 87 has both rear sandboxes with pipes loose in the packaging so needed gluing in place.

Despite the above comments it is overall a good model, performs well and very much a welcome addition to the fleet for Canute Road Quay as seen in action below.

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