Posts Tagged ‘Hornby’

Arriving hot on the heels of Bulleid Merchant Navy Pacific R3632 35024 East Asiatic Company in BR Lined express blue, see my review here, is R3717 21c7 Aberdeen Commonwealth in SR wartime black as announced as part of the Hornby 2019 range announcements.

R3717 21C7 looks imposing in SR Wartime Black

21c7 was one of the first batch of ten Merchant Navy pacifics, she was introduced in June 1942 in malachite green livery but was quickly repainted in plain black as a wartime measure. Hornby have produced her in a similar early condition to the previous R3435 21C3 ‘Royal Mail’ model released in malachite green back in 2017, see my review here.  The body captures the shape and curves of the original well, with ‘widows peak’ cowl above the smokebox and no smoke deflectors. The extensive suite of tooling by Hornby for the Merchant Navy pacific range includes the correct 5000 gallon tender, as fitted to the first ten Merchants, complete with its air smoothed curves to the front of the coal space and roof over the footplate.

Rear 3/4 view of 21C7 the excellent cab details can be seen

21c7 remained in this condition until August 1944 when she gained the more familiar cowl above the smokebox and also received short flared smoke deflectors. She gained the to become standard length and style of smoke detectors in July 1947. Prior to full rebuilding in May 1958 she received the modified wedge shaped cab , losing the curved swept cab front, in March 1950. She carried malachite green from June 1947, BR Blue from March 1950 then BR Green from December 1952. She was finally withdrawn in her rebuilt form in July 1967 due to a broken cylinder.

21c7 captures the original style front end well

I wont repeat all of my past reviews, as the mechanics of the model are the same as the other original Merchant Navys in the range with a 5-pole motor and a large flywheel, with pickups on all driving wheels and the tender giving impressive performance all round. The outstanding high level of detail especially within cab is present as we have come to expect with Hornby’s other Merchants. Also as with the previous releases the brake rodding and front steps come pre fitted, whilst a standard accessory pack contains buffer beam pipes, front coupling and two sets of cylinder drain pipework. The additional set of drain pipes are supplied, in addition to the standard accessory pack, to allow for the lower fairing in front of the cylinders on this version.

The flat nameplate will be replaced by an etched plate. The correct slightly larger ‘C’ within the number shows the attention to detail.

As with other Merchant Navys in the range the front edge of the body side, due to the limitations of the tooling for a mass production model, are perhaps slightly too thick I may well look to bevel these from the inside edge slightly to deceive the eye in the area. The decoration whilst simple is very well applied with the SR Sunshine lettering and its green shading lifting the mood against the black sides. The ‘C’ of the loco number is correctly slightly larger than the numbers. The nameplates although separately applied are printed and therefore flat looking and I will be replacing these with etched plates from Fox Transfers. The front electric lamps and lamp irons above the buffer beam have like all the versions released a slight backward lean to them. The electric lamps are in reality are hung from the underside of the swan neck style lamp iron and also had electric conduit attached. However, on the model the lamp is attached via a perpendicular lug on their back into holes on the sloping front casing.  Like I did on 35024 I will probably replaced these three lamp irons with etched brass versions so they are stronger and correctly face forwards. The lamps are correctly black (the lamp casing were black painted brass on the front and body livery colour painted steal casings on the tender). Each lamp has a silver blob to represent the lens, however in reality these lens appear more gloss black unless the lamp is actually lit.

Front end options. Early short flared deflectors left, standard length right

I also intend to forward the date the front end of mine to add the later standard cowl above the smokebox box, but I am still deciding which version of the smoke deflectors to fit; either the early short flared type or the what was to become standard style and length. The latter is a slightly easier conversion as can be seen in the image to the left. Once I have decided it will become the topic of a future post.

Despite the few points above the model even in its plain black livery captures the imposing look of this early condition Merchant Navy Pacific is a welcome addition to the Hornby range that also see the release this year in BR Green of R3649 3502 ‘Ellerman Lines’, R3716 35022 ‘Holland America Line’ and R386135017 ‘Belgian Marine’.

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Announced as part of the Hornby 2021 range, the Gangwayed Bogie Luggage vans have now arrived at retailers. An old version of these vans with a Triang heritage has been in and out of the Hornby catalogue for some time and were very much something of a comprise (and it is not even worth comparing it with these new models). These newly released models are totally new tooling from the ground up and are a very welcome addition to the range.

The line up of Hornby GBL versions Copyright & Courtesy Kernow Model Rail Centre

In total 120 of these bogie luggage vans were built between 1930 and 1931 utilising ex LSWR underframes and bogies surplus from the bogie block set coach bodies having been converted to electric stock. They were built in three batches, two different body lengths and three different bogie centres, that resulted in three initial diagrams:

  • Diagram 3098, 25/26 ton 51’ 3” bodies with 36’ 3” bogie centres. Numbered 2331-54 & 2482-90
  • Diagram 3099, 27 ton 53’ 3” bodies with 36’ 3” bogie centres. Numbered 2355-70  2461-81
  • Diagram 3100, 25/26 ton 51’ 3” bodies with 34’ 3” bogie centres. Numbered 2281-2330

The Southern coded all these vans as ‘GBL’ (Gangwayed Bogie Luggage) and later COR PMV (Corridor Parcels Miscellaneous Van) by British Railways. They we utilised mainly on Southampton Docks and other South Western Section trains and also the various overnight newspaper and mail trains.

30 of the GBLs were converted for use within casualty evacuation trains as stretcher vans. Most of these had received droplights in the centre pair of doors and when returned to the SR in 1945 these and a small number of other vans were allocated new diagram numbers as follows:

  • Diagram 3096 for the 17 ex Diagram 3098 51’3” GBLs
  • Diagram 3097 for the 16 ex Diagram 3099 53’3” GBLs

The Hornby R60021 2362 in SR Olive livery

A view of R600231A S2467S in BR Crimson Lake livery

Another view of 2362

The end view of 2362 showing the detail and exquisite lettering but showing the incorrect round buffers.

They were initially introduced in SR Olive Green livery, a very small number gained malachite. Under British Railways they were in crimson, with as few as six gaining BR(s) Green.

All were withdrawn during 1959 and 1960 with twelve lasting to 1961 for  pigeon traffic. A few entered departmental use and two have been preserved. Number S2464S was painted in Pullman car livery in July 1962 and stored in readiness to be used  as Sir Winston Churchill’s funeral hearse on 30th January 1965

Hornby have initially released five versions of the 53’3” Diagram 3099 / 3097 vans

  • R60020 – SR GBL Gangwayed Bogie Luggage van No.2362 to Diagram 3099 in SR Olive Green livery (it should be noted that 2362 was one the vans that received centre door droplights and reclassified to Diagram 3097 in 1945, so is modelled by Hornby in its pre-war guise)
  • R60020A – SR GBL Gangwayed Bogie Luggage van No.2471 to Diagram 3099 in SR Olive Green livery
  • R60021 – BR COR PMV Gangwayed Bogie Luggage van No.S2477S to Diagram 3097 (modified from Diagram 3099 with centre door droplights) in BR Crimson Lake livery
  • R60021A – BR COR PMV Gangwayed Bogie Luggage van No.S2467S to Diagram 3097 (modified from Diagram 3099 with centre door droplights) in BR Crimson Lake livery
  • R60057 – BR COR PMV Gangwayed Bogie Luggage van No.S2464S to Diagram 3097 in Pullman livery as used as Sir Winston Churchill’s funeral hearse on 30th January 1965

A side view of the end, the LSWR 8ft bogies and the underframe steel flitching plates are clearly seen.

These models capture the prototype extremely well and dimensionally accurately matches the the drawings that I have available. The heavy ex LSWR underframe is well represented, including the steel flitching plates and their retaining bolts at each end where the extension pieces for the original frames were fitted. The underframe also includes the battery boxes, dynamo and the brake vacuum cylinders, rods and V hangers, although the pull rods to the bogies are omitted.

The bogies are a well detailed recreation of the LSWR 8 foot bogies that were used on these vehicles. They are fitted with steel disc wheels, it should be noted that prior to 1945/48 these vans ran on Mansell wooden cantered wheels.
The NEM coupling pockets are mounted on close coupling cams. However, the tension lock coupling fitted already extends beyond the buffers by approximately 4mm and although the cam allows the coupling to pivot in a arc and is sprung it is hardly driven by any bogie movement except at the very extremes of bogie swing. Even on the short radius turnouts and tight curves of Canute Road Quay the coupling and cam hardly moved, so I will be fitting a shorter tensions lock coupling in mine.

A close up of the middle section of the van.

The models contain a wealth of detail and separately applied parts that includes: wire handrails, flush glazing with the protective mesh behind each window, all door handles, lamp irons, starboards, delicate foot steps on each corner of the chassis, sprung metal buffers (although they are round rather than the correct clipped top and bottom oval), brake handrail and pipework.
The roof mounted torpedo vents are also be separate parts and sit well alongside the moulded rain strips and the roof board mounting brackets.

A side on view of S2467S with the chalk boards in place overlapping the first and second planks under the outer of the pair of middle windows.

Supplied within an accessory pack are steam heat and vacuum pipes that can be fitted into the buffer beam at each end if you are not using the tension lock coupling. Also supplied are the oval chalk boards that should be located under the outer window of the pair either side of the centre doors.  These would have been fitted to the vans from new, however at least one of the preserved vans and also S2464S  as the hearse van does not have them fitted. This is I assume is why Hornby have not included these as part of the body moulding or factory fitted them.

Livery application is to the standard that you would expect from Hornby with the shaded numbers and letting on the SR version clearly well reproduced and includes the extremely small by legible “Distributed Load 10 Tons”, the end lettering and data panel, sole bar cast number plate (although the plate on the crimson version still shows the ‘R’ of ‘SR’ whereas under BR only the ‘S’ would have been picked out in white) and brake wheel notations.

These GBLs give Southern modelers another excellent luggage van to work alongside the Bogie Van B and 4 wheeled Van C previously from Hornby (or Ratio and Parkside kits) and the 4 wheeled PLV and Van U from Bachmann (or Parkside kits). 

 

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It was back in February 2015 when Hornby announced that they were to produce an original air smoothed Bulleid Merchant Pacific as part of their 2016 range, however they were then moved into the 2017 range. These first three R3434 21c1 ‘Channel Packet’, R3435 21c3 ‘Royal Mail’ and R3436 35028 ‘Clan line’ arrived in March 2017, see my review of 21c1 here.

Since then the high seas between China and the UK have been devoid of Hornby ‘Merchant Navys’ despite further versions being announced in the following years.

The right hand side view etched plates fitted

In 2018 R3632 35024  ‘East Asiatic Company’ in BR Blue was announced (the subject of this post as she has now arrived) followed in 2019 by three more versions: R3649 3502 ‘Ellerman Lines’ in BR Green, R3716 35022 ‘Holland America Line’ in BR Green and R3717 21c7 ‘Aberdeen Commonwealth’  in SR Wartime Black. Included in the 2021 range is R386135017 ‘Belgian Marine’

Hornby advised in January 2020 that the delay was due to one of factories that they use being unexpectedly at very short notice closed, due to a compulsory purchase of the land by the Chinese government! This impacted the production of the new Merchant Navy pacifics, versions of the Peckett industrial tanks, the Class 800 Azuma units and the GWR 61xx large Prairie tanks locomotives. Work to move the tooling to another factory appeared to take longer than had been hoped, however the backlog is slowly being cleared and 35024 should hopefully now be the first of the overdue excellent Merchant Navys to arrive.

Rear RH 3/4 view, the lamp lens are yet to be toned down at the rear

35024 ‘East Asiatic Company’ was the first Merchant Navy to appear in the Express Passenger Engine Blue for the newly formed British Railways. Whilst in Eastleigh works in March 1949 for Minor ‘D’ examination she was first painted in a dark blue (note: not recorded as being the experimental purple seen on some other non SR loco classes, including the wheels with three horizontal crimson bands and a hand painted early emblem on the tender. She however re-entered service in what was to become standard express passenger blue with two horizontal black bands with white lining, following inspection of the livery by members of the Railway Executive at Brighton Works.
The blue paint of the time wasn’t very practical in practice, due to the elements and the heat from the engine causing the paint to discolour and fade quite quickly hence the change to BR Green for all Passenger Locos only a couple years later.

Hornby have released 35025 in the condition in which she first ran for a while in this livery from Exmouth Junction, as she does not carry the later BR shedplate (72A) it would have been fitted sometime before May 1949 when she was also fitted with the battens on the smoke deflectors to carry the ‘Devon Belle’ wing plates.

The left hand side view, although I’ve painted out the silver lamp lenses I might make the lens itself gloss.

I wont repeat my full review of 21c1, as that can be read here, and all the positives are also on this model such as: the powerful 5 pole motor with large flywheel, all wheel pick up, the excellent coupling rods, the loco and tender brake rodding being factory fitted. Included with the loco is an accessory pack that contains a pair of front steps for the loco buffers (which might like the wheel tyres benefit from being toned down from the bright steel) and rear steps for the bufferbeam on the tender, cylinder drain cocks and also steam and vacuum pipes.
As with previous Hornby Bulleid pacifics the front steps in particular require glue to affix and is a little tricky.
The fixed rear pony truck has flangeless wheels as is Hornby’s current way for pacific wheel arrangements allowing for a better representation of the ashpan etc. It may be possible if your curves allow to fit a flanged wheelset if you wish.

Rear LH 3/4 view

The paint finish, whilst a slightly different hue to the printed box not that it maters, I think captures the drabness of the BR Passenger Blue well.
If the carpet crawler YouTube reviewer is to be believed this should along with the flat casing top be a stain finish just because another manufacturer has done so on a totally unrelated model, he also claims the nameplates are etched but printed, and that the brass cab side window frames are wood (to be fair they are wooden on the Light Pacifics). For the record whilst the blue could perhaps be only slightly more satin for an ex works condition, the casing tops should be matt black.

The excellently detailed cab interior, even down the the gauge dials, has been supplemented by some crew by Masterpiece Figures.

I only have two niggles are firstly the nameplates, whilst separately applied plastic parts are printed with none of the casting relief and I have already replaced these with etched plates from Fox Transfers.
Secondly the characteristic electric lamps that in reality are hung from the underside of the swan neck style lamp iron and also had electric conduit attached. However, on the model the lamp is attached via a perpendicular lug on their back into holes on the sloping front casing them to point upwards slightly and the very fragile plastic lamp irons to lean backwards.
I have replaced these three lamp irons with etched brass versions so they are stronger and correctly face forwards, this in itself helps trick the eye away from the lamp angle. The lamps are correctly black (the lamp casing were black painted brass on the front and body livery colour painted steal casings on the tender). Each lamp has a silver blob to represent the lens, however in reality these lens appear black unless the lamp is actually lit. I have touched away the sliver and again it helps disguise the incorrect angle of the lamps.

For anyone wanting to renumber and rename to one of other the third series Merchant Navys in blue (for details of the differences between the third series read my first ever Talking Stock post here) then the candidates to choose from are 35021/2 and 35025 to 35030, as 35025 is one of the three members of the class along with 35014 and 35011 (currently being restored back to original condition) not to gain the Blue livery.

Little niggles aside, I stand by my earlier review these models have raised the bar, capturing splendidly the front face and overall look and details that Bulleid intended. Along with the excellent smooth running powerful drive system and chassis we can look forward happily to adding other versions to the fleet when then arrive, with hopefully more versions from the tooling suit that Hornby have produced to cover most of the potential variations.

 

 

 

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Hornby announced as part of their new 2021 range their intention to produce new tooling for the Maunsell Dining Saloons to Diagram 2652 as introduced in 1927.
In my Talking Stock#39 post about the complexities of the Southern Catering vehicles I advised that in 1930 the six Diagram 2652 Saloons were reclassified as Open Thirds and renumbered 1363 to 1368.

A Diagram Diagram 2652 Dining Saloon Third

Hornby have now replicated this in model form by amending their proposed R40030 Number 7864 and R40030A Number 7867 in SR lined olive green to be Open Thirds and now numbered 1363 and 1366 respectively.  This gives those modelling the Southern Railway in the 1930s great flexibility in their accurate use.

During the war all except No. 1367 were converted for Ambulance Train use during WWII.  Four of six, were converted in July 1947 to Third / Composite Dining Saloons branded as ‘Restaurant Car’ to Diagram 2658 and numbered 7841-4 . These conversions have also been announced by Hornby as R40031 Maunsell Dining Saloon Third / Composite to diagram 2658 Number S7841S and R40031A Number S7843S in BR(s) Green. The other two were now fitted with 48 loose  2 +1 chairs and classified as First Class diners and numbered 7846/7 were were paired with newly converted Diagram 2661 Buffet cars for use on the reinstated ‘Night Ferry” service.

Views of the initial CADs and test 3D print of these vehicles can be found within Hornby’s Engine Shed update here.

 

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As we are talking Southern Railway catering vehicles it might be worth sitting down and having some light refreshment to go with the read as things are going to get a little confusing and complex!

The Southern Railway even with its relatively short distances involved, when compared with some of the other railway companies, still provided full dining services by pairing a Kitchen dining car with a dining saloon on many of its services such as Waterloo – Exeter, Waterloo – Bournemouth / Portsmouth and Weymouth, Southampton boat train services and the Brighton to Plymouth, and some Victoria – Dover services. They could also be found on the though Cardiff, Newcastle and Birkenhead services off the Southern. These paired vehicles would either be inserted within the middle of longer coaching sets, especially for the through services off the Southern; or within a train made up from multiple shorter coach sets, such as on the West of England line.

The Southern Railway (and subsequent the Southern Region) contracted out its catering services: on the South Eastern and Central Divisions it was The Pullman Car Co, and the South Western Division was originally Spiers & Pond (the LSWR contractor) superseded by Frederick Hotels in 1930.

Hornby Southern catering vehicles since 2018

The R4816 Diagram 2656 Kitchen Dining First

The first newly tooled Southern Railway Maunsell catering versions were first introduced in by Hornby in 2018 and the subsequent ‘A’ versions currently available from Hornby are:
R4816 SR Maunsell Kitchen Dining First to Diagram 2656, No. 7869 and R4816A 7865 in unlined SR Green; and R4817 BR Maunsell Kitchen Dining First to Diagram 2651, with post 1939 / 1939 modifications, No. S7861S and R4817A No. S7858S in BR(s) Green.

Read my review of these models here.

The Diagram 2656 cars were built in 1932 and a later batch built in 1934 and other than the cooking equipment fitted were similar in body style to Diagram 2650. Hornby have chosen to produce these models in unlined olive-green which is totally correct for post 1940s condition.

One of these 1932 built vehicles No. 7864 (not to be confused with the Diagram 2652 Dining Saloon Thirds R40030 Number 7864 with the earlier use of the number being produced by Hornby in 2021 see below) is preserved at the Bluebell Railway and funds are actively being raised for its full restoration see here for details on how to contribute. 

The Diagram 2651 in BR(s) green represents one of the six, originally built in 1927, coaches post rebuilding around 1935 to include the characteristic recessed double doors. There were some slight bodyside differences between these and the subsequent 20 similar cars built in 1929 and 1930.

These catering vehicles would usually have been paired in service with Maunsell Diagram 2005 Open thirds numbered 1369 to 1400 such as R4537 Number 1400 or R4833 Number 1375 in SR Olive Green and R40101 number S1338S in BR(s) Green.

Hornby 2021 releases

The Hornby 2021 range sees the introduction of new tooling for two more Southern / BR(s) catering vehicles.

A Diagram 2652 Dining Saloon Third

[Edit] The as originally announced Maunsell Diagram 2652 Dining Saloon Thirds R40030 and R40030A as numbers 7864 and 7867 respectively representing them original condition in SR lined olive green. Six of these dining salon thirds were built in 1927 and they were in service actually paired with the first Maunsell Kitchen / Dining Firsts to Diagram 2651 that were also built in 1927 and numbered 7858-7863. Modellers licence would have been required  as this Diagram in original its 1927 form has not been produced by Hornby and therefore will have to be incorrectly paired with the Diagram 2656 Kitchen Dining First instead.

The main difference between the two diagrams is that the earlier Diagram 2651 did not originally have external door or the vestibule at the dining saloon end and have smaller kitchen window adjacent to the double doors. The first batch of the Diagram 2651 were later modified to include the end doors and vestibule (although the smaller window remained) these and the subsequent later builds, with differing sizes of windows, were built with vestibules were confusingly all to the same diagram number.

The six Diagram 2652 Dining Saloon Thirds only lasted in this from until 1930 when they were reclassed as Open Thirds and renumbered in the range 1363 to 1368.
[Edit] Hornby advised at the end of January that the models R40030 and R40030A to be numbered 1363 and 1366 respectively to the longer and more flexible usage 1930 to wartime period.
During the war all except No. 1367 were converted for Ambulance Train use during WWII. (see comments below).

Just to add to the complexity and confusion with the SR catering vehicles the Diagram 2656 having been built post 1932 took over the numbers 7864 to 7869!

A Diagram Third / Composite Dining Saloon

[Edit] Four of six, now reclassified Open Thirds were converted in July 1947 to Third / Composite Dining Saloons branded as ‘Restaurant Car’ to Diagram 2658 and numbered 7841-4 . These conversions have also been announced by Hornby as R40031 Maunsell Dining Saloon Third / Composite to diagram 2658 Number S7841S and R40031A Number S7843S in BR(s) Green.

These four were actually paired with the Kitchen / Buffet cars to Diagram 2659 that themselves were converted in 1947 from Diagram 2656 Kitchen / Dining firsts and not yet available in ready to run form. So therefore will have to be incorrectly paired with the Diagram 2651 Kitchen Dining First in BR(s) green instead. The other two were now fitted with 48 loose  2 +1 chairs and classified as First Class diners and numbered 7846/7 were were paired with newly converted Diagram 2661 Buffet cars for use on the reinstated ‘Night Ferry” service.

S7841S, previously numbered 7841, 1365 and 7866, is currently surviving awaiting full restoration at the Bluebell Railway.

Also announced for 2021 are further versions of the Kitchen / Dining Firsts as R40029 to [Edit]  Diagram 2655 Number S7998S and R40029A to Diagram 2656 Number S7955S in BR crimson and cream livery. These would be suitable to be paired with the Maunsell Diagram Open Third R4835 Number S1346S in crimson and cream that was released by Hornby in 2018! This version is still, at the time of writing, thankfully available from retailers such as our friends at the Kernow Model Rail Centre.

I did say it was a bit confusing, I hope this post has helped to clarify in some way…

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Hornby have today announced their forthcoming range for 2021. The highlights from a Southern Railway perspective being new versions of the Merchant Navy’s with diecast bodies and Hornby Dublo branding, new Maunsell catering vehicles and a long awaited completely new tooled Ganywayed bogie luggage vans.

Locomotives

Although technically no new locomotive tooling for Southern modelers; however we see the introduction, following lasts years diecast models as part of the Centenary range, the introduction of two Merchant Navy Pacifics as limited editions (500 each)  under the Hornby Dublo brand. One of which is close to my heart being 35011 General Steam Navigation, as a Trustee and Director of the General Steam Navigation Locomotive Restoration Society that aims to restore her back to original condition with chain driven valve gear. To find out more about the project click here.
New liveries for the ex LBSC A1/A1X Terrier appear along with version of the Merchant Navy in the main range (although we are still awaiting a number of Merchant Navy versions  R3632 35024 in BR Blue announced in 2018 and R3649 35029 BR Green, R3716 35022 in BR Green and R3717 21C7 in SR Black from 2019 announcements).

  • R30005 – K&SER A1 class 0-6-0T No.3 “Bodiam” in K&ESR Blue livery as carried between May 1901 and the early 1930s. [Q3]
  • R30006 – BR 0-6-0T No. 32646 A1X class “Terrier” in BR unlined black with British Railways with no coal rails in SR sunshine lettering (as gained on the Isle of Wight when numbered W8) and new BR number in Gills Sans as she carried after returning from the Isle of Wight in August 1949 until approximately December 1951. [Q3]
  • R30008 – BR 0-6-0T No. 32640 A1X class “Terrier” in BR lined black and early crest and no coal rails as she was following a general repair at Eastleigh in March 1951 and subsequently working on the Hayling Island branch. [Q3]

  • R3866 – BR 4-6-2 No. 34051 “Sir Winston Churchill” Battle of Britain class with cut down tender in BR lined green with late emblem and speedometer fitted. As she ran from January 1960 and into preservation. Railway Museum collection. [Q1]
  • R3861 – BR BR 4-6-2 No. 35017 “Belgian Marine” Merchant Navy class in BR Green and early crest, no front fairing and black nameplate as she ran between March 1953 and being rebuilt in March 1957
  • R3970 – Hornby Dublo – BR 4-6-2 No. 35016 “Elders Fyffes” Merchant Navy Class in British Railways Malachite Green with Sunshine lettering as she carried between May 1949 and April 1950 (although at this time she retained the front fairings) – Die Cast body [Q3]
  • R3971 – Hornby Dublo – BR 4-6-2 No. 35011 “General Steam Navigation” Merchant Navy Class in BR Green early crest without front fairing as she carried between May 1953 and August 1957 –   Die Cast body [Q3]

Additional new tooled locomotives for 2021 include the LNER 2-8-2 P2 Class in both original and rebuilt form and a brand new BR 2-10-0 9F class. The A1 and A3 classes get an upgrade with die cast running plates. The only diesel or electric new tooling is a new industrial shunter in the form of the Ruston and Hornsby 88DS (the big brother to the previously released 48DS).  The BR Standard 6MT “Clan’s” also reappear.

Coaching Stock

2021 sees new tooling for both the Maunsell Diagram 2652 Dining Saloon Thirds and their conversions in July 1947 to  Third / Composite Dining Saloons to Diagram 2658.
The SR Gangwayed Bogie Luggage Van GBL (COR PMV as classified by BR), that has been regularly in the range since the days of Tri-ang has at long last been totally retooled to modern standards. These were introduced to Diagram 3099 built on ex LSWR 53’3″ chassis between 1929 and 1931. Thirty five were built to this diagram and most were withdrawn by 1960.
The BR MK1 range is also expanded with the addition of the Brake Corridor Composite (BCK) to Diagrams 171 and172 but not yet released in BR(s) Green.
We also see another set of the Bulleid 59ft ‘Shortie’ Coaches, see review here, in BR(s) green to make up set number 967 following repainting from crimson and cream in September 1957.

  • R40030 – SR Maunsell Third Class Dining saloon No. 7864 to Diagram 2652 in SR Lined Olive [Q4]
  • R40030A – SR Maunsell Third Class Dining saloon No. 7867 to Diagram 2652 in SR Lined Olive [Q4]
    [Edit 29/01/21] Hornby appear to have changed the running numbers of these to be their later Open Third guise, to be Nos. 1363 and 1366 respectively.

  • R40031 – BR(s) Maunsell Dining Saloon Third / Composite No. S7841S to Diagram 2658 in BR(s) Green. This coach is preserved on the Bluebell Railway. [Q4]
  • R40031A – BR(s) Maunsell Dining Saloon Third / Composite No. S7843S to Diagram 2658 in BR(s) Green [Q4]

  • R40029- BR(s) Maunsell Kitchen / Dining First No. S7998S to Diagram 2655 in BR Crimson and Cream livery [Q4]
  • R40029A – BR(s) Maunsell Kitchen / Dining First No. S7955S to Diagram 2651 in BR Crimson and Cream livery [Q4]
  • R40101 – BR(s) Maunsell Open Third No. S1338S to Diagram 2005 in BR(s) Green
  • R4888D – BR(s) Bulleid 59′ Diagram 2121 corridor brake 3rd  No. S2849S from Set 967 in BR(s) green livery [Q1]
  • R4888E – BR(s) Bulleid 59′ Diagram 2121 corridor brake 3rd  No. S2850S from Set 967 in BR(s) green livery [Q1]
  • R4886B – BR(s) Bulleid 59′ Diagram 2316 corridor composite No. S5713S from Set 967  in BR(s) green livery [Q1]

  • R400025 – BR(s) Mk1 Restaurant Buffet S1696 to Diagram 24 in BR(s) Green livery [Q3]
  • R60020 – SR GBL Gangwayed Bogie Luggage van No.2362 to Diagram 3099 in SR Olive Green livery [Q3]
  • R60020A – SR GBL Gangwayed Bogie Luggage van No.2471 to Diagram 3099 in SR Olive Green livery [Q3]
  • R60021 – BR COR PMV Gangwayed Bogie Luggage van No.S2477S to Diagram 3097 (modified from Diagram 3099 with centre door droplights fitted 1945) in BR Crimson livery [Q3]
  • R60021A – BR COR PMV Gangwayed Bogie Luggage van No.S2467S to Diagram 3097 (modified from Diagram 3099 with centre door droplights fitted 1945) in BR Crimson livery [Q3]
  • R60057 – BR COR PMV Gangwayed Bogie Luggage van No.S2464S to Diagram 3097 in Pullman livery as used as Sir Winston Churchill’s funeral hearse on 30th January 1965 (see also R3866 above) [Q3]

Additional new tooling for coaches in the 2021 are a range of BR Mk4 coaches.

Generic Coaches

Hornby are also releasing a range of 4 and 6 wheel coaches and 4 wheel baggage brakes, that appear to be generally based on a number of LBSC Stroudley designs. These are going to go head to head with, and no doubt compared to,  the Hattons range of Genesis coaches they announced in October 2019 but are yet to arrive. They are being released in a number of livery options including 6 wheelers in SR lined olive, and 4 wheelers in LBSC and LSWR liveries. They are being offered with or without fitted lighting (lighting unit can be retro fitted to the non fitted versions. A number of the versions (GNR, BR Crimson and LNER) will be immediately available Q1.

Wagons

  • R6992 – SR 14T 6 wheel Milk tank wagon United Dairies No. 4430 a representation of a Diagram 3161 tanker.

No new wagon tooling has been announced for 2021.

Railroad range

The Railroad range sees what appears to be the ex Thomas tolling (as Hornby no longer have the rights to produce Thomas the tank engine products) modified sans face R30039 in a pseudo SECR livery number 326 (that would have been H class) perhaps they would have been better to produce it in LBSCR livery as one of the extended tank E2 class?).  The range also includes R3911 Class 71 electro-diesel as 73965 in GB Railfreight blue and orange livery.

Outstanding SR/BR(s)  items 

In addition to the four Merchant Navy pacifics the following iterms from previous announcements are still outstanding, and I do not have any available update, but are collated here for reference.

  • R3507TTS – BR 4-6-0 ‘30832’ Maunsell S15 Class, Urie style tender – BR Black early crest. [2017]
  • R3731 BR 0-4-0T No. 31177 H Class in BR lined black with early crest, pull push fitted. [2019]
  • R3732 – BR 4-6-0 ”Sir Walter Raleigh” No. 30852, Maunsell Lord Nelson Class in in BR Brunswick Green with early crest,  Lemaitre chimney, smoke deflectors and high sided tender. [2019]
  • R3733 – BR 4-6-0 ‘Robert Blake’ No. 30855 Maunsell Lord Nelson Class in BR Brunswick Green with late emblem,  Lemaitre chimney,  smoke deflectors and high sided tender. [2019]
  • R3763 – SR 0-4-4t H Class No. 1552 SR black, with non shaded lettering but shaded number. [2020]
  • R3862 – SR 4-6-0 Lord Nelson Class No. 864 ‘Sir Martin Frobisher’ SR Malachite Green. [2020]
  • R3863 – LSWR 4-4-0 T9 Class No. 120 in LSWR Green as preserved. [2020]

The full Hornby 2021 range can be found on the Hornby website here of the RMweb forum here and of course all items can be pre-ordered / purchased from our friends at the Kernow Model Rail Centre 

 

 

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This months picture…

A Hornby W4 0-4-0t Peckett modified with an open cab as well as dumb buffers on Canute Road Quay

 

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The first five members of the London Brighton and South Coast Railway (LBSC) E2 class 0-6-0 tanks were introduced by L Billinton in June 1913.  In service they were found to be powerful but slightly lacking in water and therefore a further batch of 5 were ordered, although delayed by the war, and built between June 1915 and October 1916 with extended side tanks, These extended tanks  increased water capacity from 1,090 to 1,256 gallons.
They were used on shunting and short distance goods trips, their small capacity coal bunkers made them unsuitable for longer trips. They were also used on empty stock workings at Victoria and London Bridge.

E2 No. 2104 shunts at the Quay

Work in progress front 3/4 view

Work in Progress rear 3/4 view

The bulk of the E2 can be seen in comparison with the B4 class. The body is yet to be lowered on the chassis slightly.

The later style chassis with added guard irons and sandboxes. The front fixing lugs are yet to be filed smaller to lower the body (The rear lug is likewise reduced)

The front 3/4 view RH side

the RH Side 3/4 view, she awaits some weathering now

Further shunting at the Quay

Following the onset of electrification a number were used as shunters at Southampton Docks and despite their 16ft wheelbase restricting their use in some areas of the docks they stayed working the docks until 1962 when the Class 07 diesels arrived.
Withdrawal of took place between 1961 and 1963.

The Hornby model of the E2 0-6-0 first appeared in 1979 and following 4 versions, LBSC Umber (2 versions) , SR lined Black and SR olive green, production ceased in 1984.   After which the tooling was altered used for the production of some other blue model… dam I wasn’t going to mention that…

Many years ago in my yoof I simply repainted into SR ‘Sunshine’ black, now with Canute Road Quay being an ideal setting for an E2 I decided to dig the E2 out again and give her a quick win makeover, so finescale modellers look away now…

The original chassis was the standard at the time Hornby generic 0-6-0 X04 motor fitted chassis. As this is a quick win project I have decided to not at this stage built a new chassis but simply swap it for the later style of Hornby 0-6-0 generic chassis with its closed frames and smaller motor and slightly greater level of detail. This later chassis is a direct replacement and also gives better running.
To this chassis I have added front sandboxes, made from plastic rectangular section and filed to shape with wire sand pipes, and added front and rear guard irons from plasticard.

The body itself generally matches the correct dimensions for the E2 which was certainly one of the larger 0-6-0 tanks. I have added new brass buffers, pipework, clack valves and lamp irons from various bits and bobs kicking around from the spares / scrap box.
In keeping with the Brighton Style, dating from when the water in the tanks was pre heated, the tank sides were clad and the fixing bolts for the cladding were a visible feature and the E2 was no different. To represent these visible fixings I drilled then glued in 0.45mm wire before cutting the wire almost flush with the tankside.
Just underneath the running plate I have added the long horizontal air tanks on each side, made from plastic rod and some of the piping from brass wire.

The E2 is a large tank when compared to other tanks such as the B4 class, however the body as new does sit slightly too high on the chassis, and this is simply remedied by filing the underside of the front two fixing lugs and also the underside of the single rear sprung lug.

After a dusting with primer from a Halfords aerosol can she received a coat of Halfords Satin Black again from a rattle can before the smokebox and cab roof were brush painted matt black and the bufferbeam of course in red. Her identity as 2104 was added using HMRS Pressfix transfers to complete the look.

I admit she would benefit from a proper finescale chassis, but as a quick win project I think it fits the bill and will extend the life of the Hornby model seeing occasional use on canute Road Quay. A nice 3D print of the E2 with the extended tanks is available and so this might form the basis of a future project…

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This is the fourth in a series of ‘Making Quay Changes’ posts with the Canute Road Quay being transported to either a different location or era or both.  It follows my Making Quay Changes #1 post moving the scene Eastwards, and then back to Southampton with my Making Quay Changes #2 post but in the 1950s  and #3 post set in the 1920/30s. We now move somewhere / anywhere in the late 1950s / 60s with industrial locomotives providing the horse power.

Passing Peckets a modified Hornby W4 0-4-0t passes a B2 0-6-0t renamed as ‘O.S.V.Bullied’

A Hornby B2 0-6-0t ‘Leader’ shunts at the quay

a modified Hattons Andrew Barclay 14″ 0-6-0t simmers

Peckett B4 0-6-0t ‘O.V.S. Bullied’ crosses towards the quayside

A pair of Hornby Sentinels pass each other with ‘Cattewater’ passing ‘Graham’

‘Cattewater’ stays on brand shunting an oil tank wagon

the outside cranked ‘Graham’ is on loan from the Oxfordshire Ironstone Co.

ex Class 05 now No.2 pauses at the crossing

Although my usual modelling genre, as regular readers will know, is the Southern Railway between 1946 and 1949, however due to Canute Road Quay has very few visual references to either period or location (yes there are a couple, but hey…) Having deliberately when building Canute Road Quay left the vehicles and other details such as crates, sack stacks and oil drums etc. loose, it enables them to be both be moved around, to give some variety in photographs, and or replaced with other items to different periods.

In this case Canute Road Quay‘s is off the British Railways network and could be any private quayside / wharf. In and around Southampton alone there were a myriad of rail served private docks and wharves including inner and outer docks and those along the River Itchen such as Dibles Wharf, Notham, Britannia and Victoria wharf,  many of which had their own locomotives.

In this case we see a number of locomotives privately operated ranging from steam locomotives to diesel shunters sharing duties around the quay.

The steam locomotives include the the Hornby W4 0-4-0t and B2 0-6-0t Pecketts, and the Hatton’s Andrew Barclay 14″ 0-6-0t both of which I have modified for use on Canute Road Quay. As per my Workbench Witterings #3 post they have been fitted with the use of dumb, usually basic wooden blocks, buffers so often seen at such locations. They remained in surface well into the 1960s and in some cases beyond. My B2 Pecketts have had their identities changed to be ‘O.V.S. Bullied’ and ‘Leader’ (spot the theme…), nameplates obtained from my friends at 247 Developments,  and weathered.

The early 1960s saw the introduction of a number of diesel shunters such as the 34 ton chain drive 4 wheel Rolls-Royce diesel powered Sentinel shunter rated at 233hp and the later 325hp, 38 ton style with outside cranks.
The Hornby Esso  4wDM version was introduced in 1963 and was for use in the Esso Bitumen works at Cattewater, hence its name, in Plymouth
‘Graham’ (Hornby must have been tempting me to purchase this one on purpose!) was delivered new to the Oxfordshire Ironstone company as Locomotive No.10207 in May 1965 and was fitted with vacuum braking and a higher ratio gearbox for mainline working, so is obviously on loan to the quayside.
The Hornby models have been modified slightly with the lifting eyes at each end having their holes drilled out, the wasp stripes on ‘Cattewater’ continued on the side of the bufferbeam as per the prototype and also weathered.

Moving towards the late 1960s saw some of the myriad of early BR shunter types being withdrawn and some entering industrial service such as the ex Class 05. This Heljan example is modelled on the second batch built by Hunslet Engine Company of Leeds and built in 1961 numbered D2574 to D2618, had a  higher roof line, smaller wheels (3’4″ instead of 3’9″) deeper buffers with oval heads than the first batch built in 1955. D2578 was sold to HP Bulmers in 1968 and is now preserved, but seen here working at the quay.

I hope you enjoy this post, the next ‘Making Quay Changes’ post with Canute Road Quay  the next such post will be be set in its usual location, but what era will it be…?

 

 

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As I advised in my recent Covid, exhibitions, mental health and life changes post, in an attempt to restore my modelling mojo whilst on furlough I started to build a number of the wagon kits that I had added to the to do later pile over the last few years.

The Diagram 1410 Covered Goods Wagons awaiting painting

The crispness of the Cambrian Models mouldings can be clearly seen in with this Diagram 1316 open

The finished painted and lettered wagons in pre and post 1936 liveries.

The Diagram 1426 shows of its height against a low roofed Diagram 1410

The kits were all from the excellent Cambrian Models range and comprised of:

  • 4 off ex LSWR 10t Covered Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1410
  • 2 off ex SECR 10t Covered Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1426
  • 1 off ex LSWR 8 plank 12t Open Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1316

These kits are of an excellent standard, with crisp mouldings and assemble quite easily once you have got your head around some of the various options, mainly around the type and number of brakes fitted. As usual I refer to the bibles for Southern wagon builders the “Illustrated History of Southern Wagons” the four volumes are now sadly out of print but are worth tracking down if you don’t already have access to copies.

Although I follow the well written and detailed instructions; I tend to replace the plastic buffer heads with metal replacements from the Alan Gibson range or similar to give additional durability. I also add some cut lead sheet to the underside of the chassis to bring the weight up to approximately 30 grams (around one ounce for older readers) as this improves running. I always fit brass top hat pin point bearings into the axle boxes and use Alan Gibson wheels.
I tend to purchase these kits, wheels etc. either at shows, when we could, or online from H&A Models whom always provide a friendly and efficient service and in these times it’s always good to help and continue to support such excellent traders.

The Hornby Diagram 1543 ‘New’ van showing the incorrect brown and oversize Tare lettering height

The paint dries in the oven

B4 No. 82 runs around the two repainted Hornby Diagram 1543 brake vans.

A very busy scene at Canute Road Quay as all the wagon builds have come to visit

In addition to the above wagons, whilst on a roll, I have finally got round to repainting the two Hornby ex LSWR 20t Warner ‘New’ diagram 1543 brake vans that arrived at the start of year. Whist excellent models the SR versions in this first batch were not finished in the correct shade of SR Brown, also the Tare lettering was incorrectly the same size as the wagon number when it should be smaller. A nice touch by Hornby  is that they provide a separate beautifully printed plate for the “Not to work between Tonbridge and West St. Leonards via Battle” in addition to it being pre printed on the wagon side, so I have affixed these to the repaints.

For all my wagons I tend to follow the same painting process:

  • Firstly for the kit builds I give a dusting of Halford plastic primer from an aerosol ‘rattle’ can
  • I then brush paint the base colour, I prefer to paint two thin coats rather than one heavy coat.
  • I always help dry the paintwork in a warmed oven (set to less than 50 deg and the door kept open, luckily, I don’t need to ask anyone permission first!).
  • In most cases I use lettering from the HMRS Pressfix transfer range and I use a mix of pre (large SR) and post 1936 (small SR) styles to give some variety.
  • Finally, I apply Railmatch Satin Varnish from a rattle can to fix the lettering and even the finish.

Well I said finally, but actually the wagons now await degrees of weathering that I tend to do as a batch and still have to do so for those shown here.

 

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